mascot


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mas·cot

 (măs′kŏt′, -kət)
n.
A person, animal, or object supposed to bring good luck or used as the symbol of an organization, such as a sports team.

[French mascotte, sorcerer's charm, mascot, from Provençal mascoto, sorcery, fetish, from masco, witch; akin to Latin masca, specter, witch, of unknown origin.]
Word History: Mascot came into English as a borrowing of the French word mascotte, meaning "mascot, charm." The English word is first recorded in 1881, shortly after the French word (itself first recorded in 1867) was popularized by the comic opera La Mascotte by the French composer Edmond Audran (1841-1901), first performed in 1880. The opera tells the story of a maid named Bettina who brings good luck and success to those around her. If she loses her virginity, however, her powers will disappear, and the plot revolves around the attempts of a noble and a successful farmer to prevent the loss of her powers after she falls in love with a shepherd. The French word mascotte, used in this opera to designate Bettina as a person who brings luck, comes from the Provençal word mascoto, "piece of witchcraft, charm, amulet," a diminutive of masco, "witch." Provençal masco is itself undoubtedly related to the Latin word masca, "specter," and these two words are further related to a group of terms in the Romance languages that have to do with the color black—a reflection of the intimate association between sorcery and the color black in popular belief. These terms include Old French mascurer, "to daub, blacken" and Catalan mascara, "soot, smut." The group also includes the Spanish word máscara and the Italian word maschera, both meaning "mask" (probably originally referring to a face daubed with pigment). These two words are the probable sources of the English word mascara. (The meaning of the Spanish and Italian words, however, may have been influenced by the Arabic term masḫara, "object of derision, masquerade.") Italian maschera is also the source of the French word masque, "mask," which is in turn the source of the English word mask. Although the ultimate source of all these Romance words relating to the notions of "witch" and "black," remains unknown, they may have originated among the languages that were spoken in Western Europe in pre-Roman times and later replaced by Latin.

mascot

(ˈmæskət)
n
a person, animal, or thing considered to bring good luck
[C19: from French mascotte, from Provençal mascotto charm, from masco witch]

mas•cot

(ˈmæs kɒt, -kət)

n.
an animal, person, or thing adopted by a group as its symbol and bringer of good luck.
[1880–85; < French mascotte < Occitan mascoto talisman, derivative of masco sorceress. See mask]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mascot - a person or animal that is adopted by a team or other group as a symbolic figuremascot - a person or animal that is adopted by a team or other group as a symbolic figure
organism, being - a living thing that has (or can develop) the ability to act or function independently
Translations
جَلاّب الحَظ
maskot
lykkedyrmaskot
kabala
heilla-/lukkugripur, lukkudÿr
talismans
maskot

mascot

[ˈmæskət] Nmascota f

mascot

[ˈmæskɒt] nmascotte f

mascot

nMaskottchen nt

mascot

[ˈmæskət] nmascotte f inv, portafortuna m inv

mascot

(ˈmӕskət) noun
a person, animal or thing supposed to bring good luck.
References in classic literature ?
Ain't he our mascot, and didn't they strike on good after we'd struck him?
Not only is LuAnn a doTERRA distributor, but her family received help from the Mascot Miracles Foundation during a time of crisis.
In what has been described as a cross between Lisa Simpson and the Teletubbies, Sun Baby, the mascot designed by artist David Shrigley, was revealed at Fir Park and was widely condemned.
The qualifying round of the international competition for the best design of the EXPO-2017 exhibition mascot was held from 20 May to 20 June 2014 in Astana, with more than 80 competing works from around the world.
When teams struggle with name or mascot imagery, it speaks to a broader issue about how we want civil society in America today.
Jeff Kruse is proud to be a Roseburg High School Indian, and has worked hard to come up with a compromise that will allow his alma mater to keep its traditional nickname and mascot.
Redwood Credit Union continues to support and promote our mascot," she said.
The school has agreed to give the mascot a makeover, but not to drop the nickname.
Teacher Choko Oohira, who has been a mascot herself for over 25 years, puts her students through a rigorous regime.
The competition will be stiff, but Notts County mascot, Mr Magpie, is the hot favourite having won the race last year.
In the charge to change, many schools understand that a mascot is an important brand used in marketing and is a focus of media attention.
For further information on how to book the mascot package visit: www.