masculine rhyme


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masculine rhyme

n.
A rhyme made on a single stressed syllable, as in reply/deny.

masculine rhyme

n
(Poetry) prosody a rhyme between stressed monosyllables or between the final stressed syllables of polysyllabic words: book, cook; collect, direct. Compare feminine rhyme

mas′culine rhyme′


n.
a rhyme having a stressed final syllable, as disdain, complain.
[1575–85]
References in periodicals archive ?
Even more important, this final masculine rhyme draws attention to the spatial as opposed to temporal object and experience.
In classical Russian poetry, regular alternation between feminine and masculine rhyme is the norm.
Zhukovsky's brilliant translation of Byron's "The Prisoner of Chillon" (1822) retains the uniformly masculine rhyme of the original.
Then again, uniformly masculine rhyme is elevated to the status of genre marker for the folk ballad bearing the mark of English provenance that emerges following Percy and Herder in German and Russian poetry.
Structurally, masculine rhyme in the tonic-syllabic metre consists of a metrical strong position occupied by a stressed syllable; perceptually, it generates an abrupt cut-off point.
In light of this observation, if the last rhyme of an abab or abba rhyme pattern is feminine, the quatrain will be perceived as softer, gentler, more relaxed, more "smoothly curved" than when the reverse is the case, If the stanza ends with a masculine rhyme, other things being equal, it will be perceived as sharper, terser, more purposeful, more conclusive.
The masculine rhyme by contrast, has an effect similar to fermato: a directive to a musician to perform a certain passage firmly or resolutely.
Though the poem has no extended stanzas, suggesting by their omission that every stanza of the speaker's words is to be viewed as a tightly managed unit dominated by an appropriately masculine rhyme, the tail rhyme of each tercet depends upon a feminine ending.
More significant than the epistolary element, though, are the predominance of masculine rhyme in the poem, which appears in all but the b-lines, and the presence of an extra syllable in the masculine lines.
In Eugene Onegin, 40 percent of masculine rhymes, and only 13 percent of feminine ones, are rich (a 27 percent difference).
This difference between masculine and feminine rhymes can be attributed to the fact that rich feminine rhymes are relatively scarce, and for that reason lines that include them, from the point of view of production of verse, allow for fewer choices between stress profiles than lines ending with rich masculine rhymes.
One critique refers to 'the spartan trimester, the subject-verb-object structure, the monosyllabic masculine rhymes, the use of anaphora'.