mashed


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Related to mashed: Mashed potatoes

mash

 (măsh)
n.
1. A mixture of malt or other ingredients with water, heated to convert starches into fermentable sugars for use in brewing or distilling.
2. A mixture of ground grain and nutrients fed to livestock and fowl.
3. A soft pulpy mixture or mass.
4. Chiefly British Mashed potatoes.
5. A crushing or grinding.
6. Slang An infatuation or act of flirtation.
tr.v. mashed, mash·ing, mash·es
1. To convert (malt or grain) into mash.
2. To convert into a soft pulpy mass by pounding or crushing: mash potatoes. See Synonyms at crush.
3. Chiefly Southern & South Midland US To apply pressure to; press.
4. Slang To flirt with or make sexual advances to.
Phrasal Verb:
mash up
To combine (two or more audio or video recordings) to produce a composite recording.

[Middle English mash- (as in mashfat, mash tub), from Old English *māsc, *mǣsc, māx- (in māxwyrt, wort); see meik- in Indo-European roots. V., sense 4, perhaps from Romani mash, to entice.]

MASH

 (măsh)
abbr.
Mobile Army Surgical Hospital

mashed

(mæʃt)
adj
slang intoxicated; drunk
Translations

mashed

[mæʃt] ADJ mashed potatoespuré m de patatas, puré m de papas (LAm)

mashed

adj mashed potatoesKartoffelbrei mor -püree nt
References in classic literature ?
She lugged it home, cut it up, and boiled it in the big pot, mashed some of it salt and butter, for dinner.
He was a "floorsman" at Jones's, and a wounded steer had broken loose and mashed him against a pillar.
The old abbot could not speak a word, for tears and the chokings in his throat; without utterance of any sort, he folded me in his arms and mashed me.
With drooping heads and tremulous tails, they mashed their way through the thick mud, floundering and stumbling between whiles, as if they were falling to pieces at the larger joints.
Mrs Cratchit made the gravy (ready beforehand in a little saucepan) hissing hot; Master Peter mashed the potatoes with incredible vigour; Miss Belinda sweetened up the apple-sauce; Martha dusted the hot plates; Bob took Tiny Tim beside him in a tiny corner at the table; the two young Cratchits set chairs for everybody, not forgetting themselves, and mounting guard upon their posts, crammed spoons into their mouths, lest they should shriek for goose before their turn came to be helped.
Crupp's kitchen fireplace, that it was capable of cooking nothing but chops and mashed potatoes.
We followed a narrow bridle-path which traversed the beds of the mountain gorges, and when we could we got out of the way of the long trains of laden camels and asses, and when we could not we suffered the misery of being mashed up against perpendicular walls of rock and having our legs bruised by the passing freight.
They tired Jim and Eureka out, and although the field of battle was thickly covered with mashed and disabled Mangaboos, our animal friends had to give up at last and allow themselves to be driven to the mountain.
Our first volley must have mashed some heads, for when they swerved back from the cliff three of their number were left upon the ground.
That guy with the specs was I, and I got my face mashed, too, though I had the presence of mind to take off my glasses at the first.
After securing a bed at the hotel, and ordering a frugal curate's dinner (bit of fish, two chops, mashed potatoes, semolina pudding, half-pint of sherry), I sallied out to look at the town.
A bit of fish,' said John to the cook, 'and some lamb chops (breaded, with plenty of ketchup), and a good salad, and a roast spring chicken, with a dish of sausages and mashed potatoes, or something of that sort.