mason bee

(redirected from mason bees)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

mason bee

n.
Any of various solitary bees of the family Megachilidae that build nests from mud, chewed leaves, or resin.

mason bee

n
(Animals) any bee of the family Megachilidae that builds a hard domelike nest of sand, clay, etc, held together with saliva
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mason bee - any of numerous solitary bees that build nests of hardened mud and sandmason bee - any of numerous solitary bees that build nests of hardened mud and sand
bee - any of numerous hairy-bodied insects including social and solitary species
family Megachilidae, Megachilidae - leaf-cutting and mason bees
References in periodicals archive ?
These kits provide customers with everything they need to introduce and attract beneficial mason bees to a garden.
The pollinator homes will welcome mining bees, mason bees and bats and will also be installed at a pop-up park at Fifth Avenue and Pine Street in Kitsilano.
Orchard mason bees are also used as supplemental pollinators in commercial orchards.
I have mason bees that keep coming back to my door frames.
Mason bees are generally active during the spring months, typically between February and May depending on location.
Mason bees are more efficient pollinators than honeybees, and they do their jobs at the height of the blooming season.
Another stingless idea for your backyard: research ways to attract and nurture local pollinators like mason bees.
Many people are afraid of these little non-aggressive bees at first (male mason bees have no stingers, and females will only sting if trapped or squeezed), but the more we know and the more often we are around them, the more comfortable we become.
Native bees, such as mason bees, trap-nesting bees and carpenter bees, can build their nests in all of the little crevices and cavities that are provided throughout the bee hotel, including inside stems.
4:30 AN EVALUATION OF GEORGIA'S MASON BEES (OSM1A SPECIES) AND THEIR NESTING PREFERENCES**, Nicholas G.
The ones you probably see in your garden are bumblebees, honeybees, mason bees, leafcutter bees and possibly digger bees, which should make your decision a little easier.
They found major differences in the ability of these generalist mason bees to develop on pollen from the same plant species.