mason

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ma·son

 (mā′sən)
n.
1. One who builds or works with stone or brick.
2. Mason A Freemason.
tr.v. ma·soned, ma·son·ing, ma·sons
To build of or strengthen with masonry.

[Middle English, from Old French maçon, masson, of Germanic origin; see mag- in Indo-European roots.]

mason

(ˈmeɪsən)
n
1. (Professions) a person skilled in building with stone
2. (Building) a person skilled in building with stone
3. (Professions) a person who dresses stone
4. (Building) a person who dresses stone
vb
(Building) (tr) to construct or strengthen with masonry
[C13: from Old French masson, of Frankish origin; perhaps related to Old English macian to make]

Mason

(ˈmeɪsən)
n
short for Freemason

ma•son

(ˈmeɪ sən)

n.
1. a person whose trade is building with firm units, as stones or bricks.
2. a person who dresses stones or bricks.
3. (cap.) Freemason.
v.t.
4. to construct of or strengthen with masonry.
[1175–1225; < Old French machun, masson < Frankish *makjon maker, derivative of *makōn to make]

Ma•son

(ˈmeɪ sən)

n.
Charles, 1730–87, English astronomer and surveyor.

mason


Past participle: masoned
Gerund: masoning

Imperative
mason
mason
Present
I mason
you mason
he/she/it masons
we mason
you mason
they mason
Preterite
I masoned
you masoned
he/she/it masoned
we masoned
you masoned
they masoned
Present Continuous
I am masoning
you are masoning
he/she/it is masoning
we are masoning
you are masoning
they are masoning
Present Perfect
I have masoned
you have masoned
he/she/it has masoned
we have masoned
you have masoned
they have masoned
Past Continuous
I was masoning
you were masoning
he/she/it was masoning
we were masoning
you were masoning
they were masoning
Past Perfect
I had masoned
you had masoned
he/she/it had masoned
we had masoned
you had masoned
they had masoned
Future
I will mason
you will mason
he/she/it will mason
we will mason
you will mason
they will mason
Future Perfect
I will have masoned
you will have masoned
he/she/it will have masoned
we will have masoned
you will have masoned
they will have masoned
Future Continuous
I will be masoning
you will be masoning
he/she/it will be masoning
we will be masoning
you will be masoning
they will be masoning
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been masoning
you have been masoning
he/she/it has been masoning
we have been masoning
you have been masoning
they have been masoning
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been masoning
you will have been masoning
he/she/it will have been masoning
we will have been masoning
you will have been masoning
they will have been masoning
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been masoning
you had been masoning
he/she/it had been masoning
we had been masoning
you had been masoning
they had been masoning
Conditional
I would mason
you would mason
he/she/it would mason
we would mason
you would mason
they would mason
Past Conditional
I would have masoned
you would have masoned
he/she/it would have masoned
we would have masoned
you would have masoned
they would have masoned
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mason - American Revolutionary leader from Virginia whose objections led to the drafting of the Bill of Rights (1725-1792)Mason - American Revolutionary leader from Virginia whose objections led to the drafting of the Bill of Rights (1725-1792)
2.mason - English film actor (1909-1984)Mason - English film actor (1909-1984)  
3.Mason - English writer (1865-1948)
4.mason - a craftsman who works with stone or brickmason - a craftsman who works with stone or brick
artisan, journeyman, artificer, craftsman - a skilled worker who practices some trade or handicraft
5.mason - a member of a widespread secret fraternal order pledged to mutual assistance and brotherly loveMason - a member of a widespread secret fraternal order pledged to mutual assistance and brotherly love
Freemasonry, Masonry - Freemasons collectively
brother - a male person who is a fellow member (of a fraternity or religion or other group); "none of his brothers would betray him"
Knight Templar - a man who belongs to a Masonic order in the United States

mason

noun stonecutter He hired a bulldozer operator and a mason for the job.
Translations
بَنّاء
зидар
zedník
murerstenhugger
múrari, steinsmiîur
akmentašysmūrasmūrinys
akmeņkalismūrnieks
duvarcıtaş ustası

mason

[ˈmeɪsn] N
1. (= builder) → albañil mf; (= stonework specialist) → mampostero/a m/f
2. (= monumental mason) → marmolista mf (de monumentos funerarios)
3. (in quarry) → cantero/a m/f
4. (= freemason) → masón m, francmasón m
MASON-DIXON LINE
La línea Mason-Dixon o Mason and Dixon es la línea simbólica que divide el norte y el sur de Estados Unidos y que, hasta el final de la Guerra Civil, marcaba la separación entre aquellos estados en donde existía la esclavitud y aquéllos en los que no. Esta línea de demarcación, que se extiende a lo largo de 377 kilómetros, fue establecida por Charles Mason y Jeremiah Dixon en el siglo XVIII con el fin de solucionar un conflicto que ya duraba 80 años sobre la frontera entre Maryland y Pensilvania. En 1779 la línea se extendió para demarcar la frontera entre Pensilvania y Virginia (hoy Virginia del Oeste); en la actualidad aún sirve como referencia del sur en general y en las canciones de country & western los cantantes hablan con nostalgia de "cruzar la línea" para volver a sus tierras sureñas.

mason

[ˈmeɪsən] n (also stonemason) → maçon(ne) m/f

mason

Mason [ˈmeɪsən] n (also freemason) → franc-maçon m

mason

n
(= builder)Steinmetz(in) m(f); (in quarry) → Steinhauer(in) m(f) ? monumental mason
(= freemason)Freimaurer m

mason

[ˈmeɪsn] n
a. (builder) → muratore m (also stonemason) → scalpellino
b. (also freemason) → massone m

mason

(ˈmeisn) noun
(usually ˈstonemason) a skilled worker or builder in stone.
ˈmasonry noun
stone(work). He was killed by falling masonry.
References in classic literature ?
She put on a little prouder air, if possible, and added impressively: "Does you 'member Cunnel Cecil Burleigh Essex, dat died de same year yo' young Marse Tom Driscoll's pappy died, en all de Masons en Odd Fellers en Churches turned out en give him de bigges' funeral dis town ever seed?
Sultan Segued hath since built here a bridge of one arch in the same place, for which purpose he procured masons from India.
Workmen were immediately called in, and that same night the passengers at the end of the faubourg saw with surprise that carpenters and masons were occupied in repairing the lower part of the tottering house.
We shall not recount the different devices of the architects on the occasion; nor would it be decorous so to do, seeing that there was a convocation of the society of the ancient and honorable fraternity “ of the Free and Accepted Masons,’ at the head of whom was Richard, in the capacity of master, doubtless to approve or reject such of the plans as, in their wisdom, they deemed to he for the best.
That which cometh nearest to it, is to leave those arts chiefly to strangers (which, for that purpose, are the more easily to be received), and to contain the principal bulk of the vulgar natives, within those three kinds, - tillers of the ground; free servants; and handicraftsmen of strong and manly arts, as smiths, masons, carpenters, etc.
Then she placed the can before her, and turned the tap, and while the beer was running she would not let her eyes be idle, but looked up at the wall, and after much peering here and there, saw a pick-axe exactly above her, which the masons had accidentally left there.
All at once, he remembered that some masons had been at work all day repairing the wall, the timber-work, and the roof of the south tower.
It was a rude, mud-built town in the time of the Britons, who squatted there, until the Roman legions evicted them; and replaced their clay-baked walls by mighty fortifications, the trace of which Time has not yet succeeded in sweeping away, so well those old-world masons knew how to build.
The story and a half of which it consists had been knocked up cheaply, by carpenters I should say rather than masons, and the general effect is of a brightly coloured van that has stuck for ever on its way through the passage.
Build a house round her," they cried, and at once everybody perceived that this was the thing to do; in a moment a hundred fairy sawyers were among the branches, architects were running round Maimie, measuring her; a bricklayer's yard sprang up at her feet, seventy-five masons rushed up with the foundation stone and the Queen laid it, overseers were appointed to keep the boys off, scaffoldings were run up, the whole place rang with hammers and chisels and turning lathes, and by this time the roof was on and the glaziers were putting in the windows.
There are rogues and knaves here, friars and priests, barons and burgesses, bakers and butchers, tailors and tanners, masons and miners, and folk of many other crafts.
The wheel then sank little by little, and with it the massive ring of masonry, on the upper bed of which the masons labored incessantly, always reserving some vent holes to permit the escape of gas during the operation of the casting.