masque


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masque

also mask  (măsk)
n.
1. A dramatic entertainment, usually performed by masked players representing mythological or allegorical figures, that was popular in England in the 1500s and early 1600s.
2. A dramatic verse composition written for such an entertainment.

[French; see mask.]

masque

(mɑːsk) or

mask

n
1. (Theatre) a dramatic entertainment of the 16th to 17th centuries in England, consisting of pantomime, dancing, dialogue, and song, often performed at court
2. (Theatre) the words and music written for a masque
3. (Clothing & Fashion) short for masquerade
[C16: variant of mask]

masque

or mask

(mæsk, mɑsk)

n.
1. an elaborate court entertainment in England in the 16th and 17th centuries combining pantomime, dialogue, music, singing, dancing, and mechanical effects.
2. a dramatic composition for such entertainment.
[1505–15; < Middle French]

masque

A typical European Renaissance dramatic form, with actors using masks and costumes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.masque - a party of guests wearing costumes and masksmasque - a party of guests wearing costumes and masks
fancy-dress ball, masked ball, masquerade ball - a ball at which guests wear costumes and masks
party - a group of people gathered together for pleasure; "she joined the party after dinner"
Translations

masque

[mɑːsk] Nmascarada f

masque

nMaskenspiel nt
References in classic literature ?
Lermontoff's Bal Masque is based on that idea--a stupid and unnatural one, in my opinion; but he was hardly more than a child when he wrote it.
She had been led through the best galleries, had been taken to the chief points of view, had been shown the grandest ruins and the most glorious churches, and she had ended by oftenest choosing to drive out to the Campagna where she could feel alone with the earth and sky, away-from the oppressive masquerade of ages, in which her own life too seemed to become a masque with enigmatical costumes.
I smiled as I unfolded it, and devised how I would tease you about your aristocratic tastes, and your efforts to masque your plebeian bride in the attributes of a peeress.
Somehow he had not seen the real story, but some game or masque.
Double masques, one of men, another of ladies, addeth state and variety.
The masques, mummeries, and festive customs, described in the text, are in accordance with the manners of the age.
But a band of Puritans, who watched the scene, invisible themselves, compared the masques to those devils and ruined souls with whom their superstition peopled the black wilderness.
Erring Thought and perverted Wisdom were made to put on masques, and play the fool.
This gave them the seeming of ghostly masques, undertakers in a spectral world at the funeral of some ghost.
These shows were called by various names, Pageants, Masques, Interludes, Mummings or Disguisings, and on every great or little occasion there was sure to be something of the sort.
Masque general manager Stephanie Hansen lists "Bonnie and Clyde," "Hugh Jackman, Back on Broadway" and the Brooklyn rock-opera "Stop the Virgens" among the company's upcoming projects.
Lauren Shohet's Reading Masques: The English Masque and Public Culture in the Seventeenth Century is the first study to examine masques from a reception and production vantage point.