convection

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Related to Mass flow: Mass flow hypothesis
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convection
Air heated by a space heater rises and is replaced by cool air, creating a convection current that circulates hot air throughout a room.

con·vec·tion

 (kən-vĕk′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of conveying; transmission.
2. Physics
a. Heat transfer in a gas or liquid by the circulation of currents from one region to another.
b. Fluid motion caused by an external force such as gravity.
3. Meteorology The transfer of heat or other atmospheric properties by massive motion within the atmosphere, especially by such motion directed upward.

[Late Latin convectiō, convectiōn-, from convectus, past participle of convehere, to carry together : Latin com-, com- + Latin vehere, to carry; see wegh- in Indo-European roots.]

con·vec′tion·al adj.
con·vec′tive adj.
con·vec′tive·ly adv.

convection

(kənˈvɛkʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) a process of heat transfer through a gas or liquid by bulk motion of hotter material into a cooler region. Compare conduction1
2. (Physical Geography) meteorol the process by which masses of relatively warm air are raised into the atmosphere, often cooling and forming clouds, with compensatory downward movements of cooler air
3. (Geological Science) geology the slow circulation of subcrustal material, thought to be the mechanism by which tectonic plates are moved
[C19: from Late Latin convectiō a bringing together, from Latin convehere to bring together, gather, from vehere to bear, carry]
conˈvectional adj
conˈvective adj

con•vec•tion

(kənˈvɛk ʃən)

n.
1. the transfer of heat by the circulation or movement of the heated parts of a liquid or gas.
2. the vertical transport of atmospheric properties, esp. upward (disting. from advection).
3. the act of conveying or transmitting.
[1615–25; < Late Latin]
con•vec′tion•al, adj.
click for a larger image
convection
Air heated by a space heater rises, then cools and falls to be heated and rise again. This cycle creates a convection current that circulates hot air throughout a room.

con·vec·tion

(kən-vĕk′shən)
The transfer of heat energy through liquids and gases by the movement of molecules. When molecules of the liquid or gas come in contact with a source of heat, they move apart and away from the source of heat, and cooler molecules take their place. Eventually, as the cooler molecules are heated, they move as well, and a convection current forms, transferring the heat. See Note at conduction.

convection

the vertical movement of elements of the atmosphere. Cf. advection.
See also: Atmosphere

convection

1. The upward motion of a body of air which transfers heat from ground level to the upper part of the atmosphere.
2. Heat transfer by means of currents circulating through fluids.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.convection - the transfer of heat through a fluid (liquid or gas) caused by molecular motionconvection - the transfer of heat through a fluid (liquid or gas) caused by molecular motion
temperature change - a process whereby the degree of hotness of a body (or medium) changes
2.convection - (meteorology) the vertical movement of heat or other properties by massive motion within the atmosphere
meteorology - the earth science dealing with phenomena of the atmosphere (especially weather)
natural action, natural process, action, activity - a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"
Translations
إنْتِقال الحَرارة بِالحَمْل، نَقل حَراري
prouděnívedení
konvektionvarmestrømning
hõáramlás
varmaburîur
konvekcija
konvekcija
prúdenie
iletimkonveksiyon

convection

[kənˈvekʃən] Nconvección f

convection

[kənˈvɛkʃən]
nconvection f
modif [current, cell] → de convection convection ovenconvection oven nfour m à convection

convection

nKonvektion f

convection

[kənˈvɛkʃn] nconvezione f

convection

(kənˈvekʃən) noun
the passing of heat through liquids or gases by means of currents.
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