mates


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mate 1

 (māt)
n.
1. One of a matched pair: the mate to this glove.
2. A spouse or romantic partner.
3.
a. Either of a pair of birds or other animals that associate in order to propagate.
b. Either of a pair of animals brought together for breeding.
c. Either of a pair of plants, fungi, or other organisms that engage in sexual reproduction or conjugation with each other.
4.
a. A person with whom one is in close association; an associate.
b. Chiefly British A good friend or companion.
c. A person with whom one shares living quarters. Often used in combination: advertised for a new flatmate.
5. A deck officer on a merchant ship ranking next below the master.
6. A US Navy petty officer who is an assistant to a warrant officer.
v. mat·ed, mat·ing, mates
v.tr.
1. To join closely or combine: an engine that is mated to a four-speed transmission.
2. To cause to be united in marriage or a romantic sexual relationship.
3. To cause (organisms) to breed or bring (organisms) into close proximity for breeding.
v.intr.
1. To become joined in marriage or a romantic sexual relationship.
2.
a. To be paired for reproducing; breed.
b. To engage in sexual reproduction or conjugation.

[Middle English, from Middle Low German gemate, mate, messmate.]

mate 2

 (māt)
n.
A checkmate.
tr. & intr.v. mat·ed, mat·ing, mates
To checkmate or achieve a checkmate.

[Middle English, from Old French mat, checkmated, from Arabic māt, he has died; see checkmate.]

click for a larger image
mate3
bombilla (foreground) and mate cup(background)

ma·te 3

 (mä′tā) also ma·té (mä-tĕ′)
n.
1. An evergreen shrub or small tree (Ilex paraguariensis) of South America, widely cultivated for its leaves, which are used to prepare a tealike beverage.
2. A tealike beverage, popular in South America, made from the dried leaves of this plant. Also called Paraguay tea, yerba mate.
3. An oval or rounded container or cup, traditionally made from a hollow calabash, in which this tea is prepared and served.

[American Spanish, from Quechua mati, calabash container.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mates - a pair of people who live togethermates - a pair of people who live together; "a married couple from Chicago"
family unit, family - primary social group; parents and children; "he wanted to have a good job before starting a family"
power couple - a couple both of whom have high-powered careers or are politically influential
DINK - a couple who both have careers and no children (an acronym for dual income no kids)
References in classic literature ?
At breakfast time, eating nothing myself, I presided with such frigid dignity that the two mates were only too glad to escape from the cabin as soon as decency permitted; and all the time the dual working of my mind distracted me al- most to the point of insanity.
Now these three mates --Starbuck, Stubb, and Flask, were momentous men.
I met my mates in the morning (and, oh, but I am old
Gust, that he might the better observe, clambered into the branches of a tree to the rear of them, being careful that the leafy fronds hid him from the view of his erstwhile mates.
At such times her running mates flashed their teeth and growled threateningly across at each other.
On 16 July mate reported in the morning that one of the crew, Petrofsky, was missing.
I dudna miss the mate ot the first, what o' routin' out Chips an' bulkheadun' thot door an' stretchun' the tarpaulin over the sky-light.
The first approach to the land, as yet invisible to the crew's eyes, is announced by the brisk order of the chief mate to the boatswain: "We will get the anchors over this afternoon" or "first thing to-morrow morning," as the case may be.
On the schooner were two white men, the skipper and the second mate, with half a dozen black boys.
I now think that his seeming desertion of me had been but due to a desire to search out his ferocious mate and bring her, too, to live with me.
It was Franklin, the thick chief mate, who was addressing him with a watchful appraising stare of his prominent black eyes: "You'd better take a couple of these chaps with you and look out for her aft.
We found her a ship of Bristol, bound home from Barbadoes, but had been blown out of the road at Barbadoes a few days before she was ready to sail, by a terrible hurricane, while the captain and chief mate were both gone on shore; so that, besides the terror of the storm, they were in an indifferent case for good mariners to bring the ship home.