matricide


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Related to matricide: Mariticide

mat·ri·cide

 (măt′rĭ-sīd′)
n.
1. The act of killing one's mother.
2. One who kills one's mother.

[Latin mātricīdium and mātricīda : mātri-, matri- + -cīdium and -cīda, -cide.]

mat′ri·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.

matricide

(ˈmætrɪˌsaɪd; ˈmeɪ-)
n
1. the act of killing one's own mother
2. a person who kills his mother
[C16: from Latin mātrīcīdium (the act), mātrīcīda (the agent). See matri-, -cide]
ˌmatriˈcidal adj

mat•ri•cide

(ˈmæ trɪˌsaɪd, ˈmeɪ-)

n.
1. the act of killing one's mother.
2. a person who kills his or her mother.
[1585–95; < Latin]
mat`ri•cid′al, adj.

matricide

1. the killing of one’s mother.
2. a person who has killed his mother. — matricidal, adj.
See also: Parents
1. the killing of one’s mother.
2. a person who has killed his mother. — matricidal, adj.
See also: Killing
1. the killing of one’s mother.
2. one who has killed his mother. — matricidal, adj.
See also: Mother
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.matricide - a person who murders their mother
parricide - someone who kills his or her parent
2.matricide - the murder of your mother
parricide - the murder of your own father or mother
Translations

matricide

[ˈmeɪtrɪsaɪd] N
1. (= act) → matricidio m
2. (= person) → matricida mf

matricide

n (= act)Muttermord m; (= person)Muttermörder(in) m(f)

matricide

[ˈmætrɪˌsaɪd] n (crime) → matricidio; (person) → matricida m/f

mat·ri·cide

n. matricidio.
References in classic literature ?
Tierra del Fuego, first arrival -- Good Success Bay -- An Account of the Fuegians on board -- Interview With the Savages -- Scenery of the Forests -- Cape Horn -- Wigwam Cove -- Miserable Condition of the Savages -- Famines -- Cannibals -- Matricide -- Religious Feelings -- Great Gale -- Beagle Channel -- Ponsonby Sound -- Build Wigwams and settle the Fuegians -- Bifurcation of the Beagle Channel -- Glaciers -- Return to the Ship -- Second Visit in the Ship to the Settlement -- Equality of Condition amongst the Natives.
David Konstan vividly proposes that "the horror naturally attaching to matricide dissolves the authority of divine ordinances, and renders moot the justice of the cause" (1985, 177).
In her work on matricide and her reading of the Oresteia, she writes:
He is brought back to the human world by a priest who also burdens him with the guilty knowledge that his mother committed suicide in horror at his fate, indirectly making him a matricide.
Eventually he abandoned the Hulme-Parker matricide and concentrated instead on the 1959 massacre that produced In Cold Blood.
The expanse of the psychic foreclosure of the mother (discussed in terms of a Jocaste Complex, in Ettinger, "Antigone with(out) Jocaste," 217) and the psychic matricide offered by the cultural symbolization in patriarchal society for the subjectivization processes affect a matrixial Thanatos that turns against the self (Ettinger, 216 onward).
29, 2014) at the UIC Forum in The Trial of Orestes, a mock trial that tried the Greek mythological figure for matricide.
You don't love someone for your whole life--that impossible hope is the source of adultery, matricide, betrayal of friends .
Lamb himself was proof of this also; in 1796, shortly before the matricide, he spent time in a madhouse, as a letter to Coleridge reveals: "Coleridge, I know not what suffering scenes you have gone through at Bristol.
Judge Ghulam Rasul Mansoor told Pajhwok Afghan News that Mohammad Salim, 22, had been convicted on the charge of matricide.
Only this act of matricide can keep her daughter safe from the brutality she is sure to witness and suffer and only through this act of matricide is this woman, this mother, able to love her daughter perfectly and resist the system that allows for her and all of her daughters' continued abuse.
The aim of this article is to explore the various ways in which he toys with historical reality and blurs the borderline between fiction and biography in The Lambs of London (2004), offering thus an alternative rendering of two unrelated offences connected with late eighteenth and early nineteenth century London literary circles: Mary Lamb's matricide and William-Henry Ireland's forgeries of the Shakespeare Papers.