mawkin

mawkin

(ˈmɔːkɪn)
n
1. (Animals) a variant of malkin
2. dialect
a. a slovenly woman
b. a scarecrow
References in classic literature ?
I'm as ready as a mawkin can be--there's nothing awanting to frighten the crows, now I've got my ear-droppers in.
And you, as have been here ever since last Michaelmas, and I hired you at Treddles'on stattits, without a bit o' character--as I say, you might be grateful to be hired in that way to a respectable place; and you knew no more o' what belongs to work when you come here than the mawkin i' the field.
The Rodewald Suite will have shows from Jim Moray (April 18), John O'Connell (May 5), Mawkin (May 11), The Imagined Village (May 25), a Woody Guthrie Folk Club Special (May 31) and Amelia Curran and Lizzie Nunnery (June 21).
James Hanks from the Philharmonic Hall says: "Our commitment to folk music continues with a number of the genre's best artists visiting us including Mawkin, The Imagined Village, the Unthanks, Andy Irvine, and we are delighted to welcome Nora Guthrie, Woody Guthrie's daughter, for a Woody Guthrie Folk Night Special.
FOLK & COUNTRY Mawkin Causley/A Touch of Klez: 7.
Also making waves at the moment and taking part in Folkport is five-piece outfit Mawkin Causley, a successful collaboration between singer Jim Causley and the band Mawkin.
Mawkin Causley, playing Folkport at Southport Arts Centre
Someone who was considered idle was referred to as being mawkin, a word also used to describe a scarecrow.
Anna De Lisle Wells, 23, a promising amateur, was found dead at Mawkin Farm, Ford, Gloucestershire.
Spug is a local word for a sparrow in northern and central England; armhole is a variant on armpit in the west and east Midlands; pumps is the western term for plimsolls, now being replaced pretty well everywhere by trainers; urchin is a hedgehog in Worcestershire, Staffordshire and the west of Warwickshire; and mawkin is a dialect term for scarecrow in a corridor running from London to the Welsh border.