maxim


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Related to maxim: FHM

max·im

 (măk′sĭm)
n.
A succinct formulation of a fundamental principle, general truth, or rule of conduct. See Synonyms at saying.

[Middle English maxime, from Old French, from Medieval Latin maxima, from maxima (prōpositiō), greatest (premise), feminine of Latin maximus, greatest; see meg- in Indo-European roots.]

maxim

(ˈmæksɪm)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a brief expression of a general truth, principle, or rule of conduct
[C15: via French from Medieval Latin, from maxima, in the phrase maxima prōpositio basic axiom (literally: greatest proposition); see maximum]

Maxim

(ˈmæksɪm)
n
(Biography) Sir Hiram Stevens. 1840–1916, British inventor of the first automatic machine gun (1884), born in the US

max•im

(ˈmæk sɪm)

n.
1. an expression of a general truth or principle, esp. an aphoristic or sententious one.
2. a principle or rule of conduct.
[1400–50; « Medieval Latin maxima < Latin maximus, superlative of magnus, great]
syn: See proverb.

Max•im

(ˈmæk sɪm)

n.
1. Sir Hiram Stevens, 1840–1916, English inventor, born in the U.S.
2. his brother, Hudson, 1853–1927, U.S. inventor.

maxim

a short, pithy statement that serves as a motto. — maximist, n.
See also: Proverbs
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maxim - a saying that is widely accepted on its own merits
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
aphorism, apophthegm, apothegm - a short pithy instructive saying
gnome - a short pithy saying expressing a general truth
moralism - a moral maxim
2.maxim - English inventor (born in the United States) who invented the Maxim gun that was used in World War I (1840-1916)Maxim - English inventor (born in the United States) who invented the Maxim gun that was used in World War I (1840-1916)

maxim

noun saying, motto, adage, proverb, rule, saw, gnome, dictum, axiom, aphorism, byword, apophthegm I believe in the maxim 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it'.

maxim

noun
A usually pithy and familiar statement expressing an observation or principle generally accepted as wise or true:
Translations
قاعِدَه
aforismusmravní zásadarčení
grundsætningleveregel
spakmæli
maksimasentencija
principssentence
maxima
özdeyişvecize

maxim

[ˈmæksɪm] Nmáxima f

maxim

[ˈmæksɪm] nmaxime f

maxim

nMaxime f

maxim

[ˈmæksɪm] nmassima

maxim

(ˈmaksim) noun
a saying, general truth or rule giving a guide to good behaviour. `He who hesitates is lost' is a well-known maxim.
References in classic literature ?
I like not the principle of the natives, which teaches them to submit without a struggle, in emergencies that appear desperate," he said, while busied in this employment; "our own maxim, which says, 'while life remains there is hope', is more consoling, and better suited to a soldier's temperament.
Truth to say, he was a conscientious man, and ever bore in mind the golden maxim, "Spare the rod and spoil the child.
This last maxim my father seemed to consider a settler in most alleged cases of cruelty.
The frequency of this has had the effect to establish among the slaves the maxim, that a still tongue makes a wise head.
Perhaps, then, you would bestow it as a reward on that person who wrote the ablest defence of your favourite maxim, that no one can ever be in love more than once in their life--your opinion on that point is unchanged, I presume?
That sounds a dangerous maxim, sir; because one can see at once that it is liable to abuse.
What do you say to the universally-accepted maxim that 'all stratagems are fair in love and war'?
Well, my sweet," said Miss Pross, nodding her head emphatically, "the short and the long of it is, that I am a subject of His Most Gracious Majesty King George the Third;" Miss Pross curtseyed at the name; "and as such, my maxim is, Confound their politics, Frustrate their knavish tricks, On him our hopes we fix, God save the King
But he applied that maxim to our marriage, my dear; and that was so far prematurely entered into, in consequence, that I never recovered the expense.
Without disputing a maxim urged by such grave authority, the Palmer thanked them for their courtesy, but observed that he had included in his religious vow, an obligation never to speak in the kitchen on matters which were prohibited in the hall.
Although we usually call reward and punishment the two hinges upon which all government turns, yet I could never observe this maxim to be put in practice by any nation except that of Lilliput.
What was, was; and may the good that is to come be for all, and the evil for him who goes to look for it -your worship must know that the beginning the old folk used to put to their tales was not just as each one pleased; it was a maxim of Cato Zonzorino the Roman, that says 'the evil for him that goes to look for it,' and it comes as pat to the purpose now as ring to finger, to show that your worship should keep quiet and not go looking for evil in any quarter, and that we should go back by some other road, since nobody forces us to follow this in which so many terrors affright us.