maze


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maze

 (māz)
n.
1.
a. An intricate, usually confusing network of interconnecting pathways, as in a garden; a labyrinth.
b. A physical situation in which it is easy to get lost: a maze of bureaucratic divisions.
2. A graphic puzzle, the solution of which is an uninterrupted path through an intricate pattern of line segments from a starting point to a goal.
3. Something made up of many confused or conflicting elements; a tangle: a maze of government regulations.
tr.v. mazed, maz·ing, maz·es Chiefly Southern US
1. To bewilder or astonish.
2. To stupefy; daze.

[Middle English mase, confusion, maze, from masen, to confuse, daze, from Old English āmasian, to confound; see amaze.]

maze

(meɪz)
n
1. a complex network of paths or passages, esp one with high hedges in a garden, designed to puzzle those walking through it. Compare labyrinth1
2. a similar system represented diagrammatically as a pattern of lines
3. any confusing network of streets, pathways, etc: a maze of paths.
4. a state of confusion
vb
an archaic or dialect word for amaze
[C13: see amaze]
ˈmazeˌlike adj
ˈmazement n

maze

(meɪz)

n., v. mazed, maz•ing. n.
1. a confusing network of paths or passages; labyrinth.
2. an intricate system that daunts or perplexes.
3. Chiefly Dial. a state of bewilderment.
v.t.
4. Chiefly Dial. to daze; stupefy.
[1250–1300; Middle English mase, n. use of aph. variant of amasen to amaze]
mazed•ly (ˈmeɪzd li, ˈmeɪ zɪd-) adv.
mazed′ness, n.
maze′like`, adj.

Maze

 a complexity of winding paths or passages.
Examples: maze of arteries, 1615; of bracken and briar, 1872; of history, 1781; of metaphor and music, 1837; of dirty traditions and foolish ceremonies, 1542.

maze


Past participle: mazed
Gerund: mazing

Imperative
maze
maze
Present
I maze
you maze
he/she/it mazes
we maze
you maze
they maze
Preterite
I mazed
you mazed
he/she/it mazed
we mazed
you mazed
they mazed
Present Continuous
I am mazing
you are mazing
he/she/it is mazing
we are mazing
you are mazing
they are mazing
Present Perfect
I have mazed
you have mazed
he/she/it has mazed
we have mazed
you have mazed
they have mazed
Past Continuous
I was mazing
you were mazing
he/she/it was mazing
we were mazing
you were mazing
they were mazing
Past Perfect
I had mazed
you had mazed
he/she/it had mazed
we had mazed
you had mazed
they had mazed
Future
I will maze
you will maze
he/she/it will maze
we will maze
you will maze
they will maze
Future Perfect
I will have mazed
you will have mazed
he/she/it will have mazed
we will have mazed
you will have mazed
they will have mazed
Future Continuous
I will be mazing
you will be mazing
he/she/it will be mazing
we will be mazing
you will be mazing
they will be mazing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been mazing
you have been mazing
he/she/it has been mazing
we have been mazing
you have been mazing
they have been mazing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been mazing
you will have been mazing
he/she/it will have been mazing
we will have been mazing
you will have been mazing
they will have been mazing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been mazing
you had been mazing
he/she/it had been mazing
we had been mazing
you had been mazing
they had been mazing
Conditional
I would maze
you would maze
he/she/it would maze
we would maze
you would maze
they would maze
Past Conditional
I would have mazed
you would have mazed
he/she/it would have mazed
we would have mazed
you would have mazed
they would have mazed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maze - complex system of paths or tunnels in which it is easy to get lostmaze - complex system of paths or tunnels in which it is easy to get lost
system - instrumentality that combines interrelated interacting artifacts designed to work as a coherent entity; "he bought a new stereo system"; "the system consists of a motor and a small computer"
2.maze - something jumbled or confused; "a tangle of government regulations"
perplexity - trouble or confusion resulting from complexity

maze

noun web, puzzle, confusion, tangle, snarl, mesh, labyrinth, imbroglio, convolutions, complex network the maze of rules and regulations a maze of dimly-lit corridors

maze

noun
Something that is intricately and often bewilderingly complex:
verb
Chiefly Regional. To dull the senses, as with a heavy blow, a shock, or fatigue:
Translations
مَتَاهَةٌمَتاهَه
bludiště
labyrint
sokkelolabyrintti
labirint
völundarhús
迷路
미로
raizginys
labirints
bludisko
labyrint
ทางวกวน
mê cung

maze

[meɪz] Nlaberinto m

maze

[ˈmeɪz] n
(mythological)labyrinthe m, dédale m
(in garden, playground)labyrinthe m
(= network) → labyrinthe m, dédale m
a maze of streets → un dédale de rues, un labyrinthe de rues
a maze of corridors → un dédale de couloirs, un labyrinthe de couloirs
(= large number of complicated things) a maze of rules → un dédale de règles

maze

nIrrgarten m; (= puzzle)Labyrinth nt; (fig)Wirrwarr m, → Gewirr nt; the maze of streetsdas Gewirr der Straßen

maze

[meɪz] ndedalo, labirinto

maze

(meiz) noun
a deliberately confusing series of paths, often surrounded by walls or hedges, from which it's difficult to find the way out. I'm lost in a maze of rules and regulations.

maze

مَتَاهَةٌ bludiště labyrint Irrgarten λαβύρινθος laberinto sokkelo labyrinthe labirint labirinto 迷路 미로 doolhof labyrint labirynt labirinto лабиринт labyrint ทางวกวน labirent mê cung 迷宫

maze

n. laberinto.
References in classic literature ?
She had a way of turning them swiftly upon an object and holding them there as if lost in some inward maze of contemplation or thought.
Like thee and thine, venerable chief," she continued, pressing her hands convulsively on her heart, and suffering her head to droop until her burning cheeks were nearly concealed in the maze of dark, glossy tresses that fell in disorder upon her shoulders, "the curse of my ancestors has fallen heavily on their child.
She began to wonder, it is true, why she did not wake up, and at what still more intolerable pitch of dizzy trouble her spirit would struggle out of the maze, and make her conscious that nothing of all this had actually happened.
There is no path to guide us out of this dismal maze.
For with the charts of all four oceans before him, Ahab was threading a maze of currents and eddies, with a view to the more certain accomplishment of that monomaniac thought of his soul.
Now, the first time Ahab was perched aloft; ere he had been there ten minutes; one of those red-billed savage sea-hawks which so often fly incommodiously close round the manned mast-heads of whalemen in these latitudes; one of these birds came wheeling and screaming round his head in a maze of untrackably swift circlings.
This is quite irresistible, and every one in the room joins in, until the place becomes a maze of flying skirts and bodies quite dazzling to look upon.
I was dazed, stupefied; I had no command over myself, I only wandered purposely about, like one out of his mind; so the soldiers took hold of me, and pulled me along with them, out of the cell and along the maze of underground corridors, and finally into the fierce glare of daylight and the upper world.
High up and out of sight, over the prodigious stage of the court theater is a maze of interlacing water-pipes, so pierced that in case of fire, innumerable little thread-like streams of water can be caused to descend; and in case of need, this discharge can be augmented to a pouring flood.
He did these pantograph enlargements on sheets of white cardboard, and made each individual line of the bewildering maze of whorls or curves or loops which consisted of the "pattern" of a "record" stand out bold and black by reinforcing it with ink.
Southward of this venerable structure lies the street labyrinth of Lambeth; and nearly midway, in that part of the maze of houses which is placed nearest to the river, runs the dingy double row of buildings now, as in former days, known by the name of Vauxhall Walk.
I was so sensitively aware, indeed, of being younger than I could have wished, that for some time I could not make up my mind to pass her at all, under the ignoble circumstances of the case; but, hearing her there with a broom, stood peeping out of window at King Charles on horseback, surrounded by a maze of hackney-coaches, and looking anything but regal in a drizzling rain and a dark-brown fog, until I was admonished by the waiter that the gentleman was waiting for me.