me


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ME

abbr.
1. also Me. Maine
2.
a. mechanical engineer
b. mechanical engineering
3. medical examiner
4. Middle English

me

 (mē)
pron.The objective case of I1
1. Used as the direct object of a verb: He assisted me.
2. Used as the indirect object of a verb: They offered me a ride.
3. Used as the object of a preposition: This letter is addressed to me.
4. Informal Used as a predicate nominative: It's me. See Usage Notes at be, but, I1.
5. Nonstandard Used reflexively as the indirect object of a verb: I bought me a new car.

[Middle English, from Old English ; see me- in Indo-European roots.]
Our Living Language Speakers of vernacular varieties of English, especially in the South, will commonly utter sentences like I bought me some new clothes or She got her a good job, in which the objective form of the pronoun (me, her) rather than the reflexive pronoun (myself, herself) is used to refer back to the subject of the sentence (I, She). However, the reflexive pronoun of Standard English cannot always be replaced by the vernacular objective pronoun. For example, Jane baked her and John some cookies doesn't mean "Jane baked herself and John some cookies." In this sentence, her must refer to someone other than Jane, just as it does in Standard English. In addition, forms like me and her cannot be used in place of myself or herself unless the noun in the phrase following the pronoun is preceded by a modifier such as some, a, or a bunch of. Thus, sentences such as I cooked me some dinner and We bought us a bunch of candy are commonplace; sentences such as I cooked me dinner and We bought us candy do not occur at all. Sometimes objective pronouns can occur where reflexive pronouns cannot. For example, one might hear in vernacular speech I'm gonna write me a letter to the president; nobody, no matter what variety he or she speaks, would say I'm gonna write myself a letter to the president.

Me

the chemical symbol for
(Chemistry) the methyl group

ME

abbreviation for
1. (Placename) Maine
2. (Professions) Marine Engineer
3. (Nautical Terms) Marine Engineer
4. (Professions) Mechanical Engineer
5. (Mechanical Engineering) Mechanical Engineer
6. (Christian Churches, other) Methodist Episcopal
7. (Professions) Mining Engineer
8. (Mining & Quarrying) Mining Engineer
9. (Languages) Middle English
10. (Historical Terms) Middle English
11. (in titles) Most Excellent
12. (Pathology) myalgic encephalopathy

me

the internet domain name for
(Computer Science) Montenegro

Me

the chemical symbol for
(Chemistry) the methyl group

ME

abbreviation for
1. (Placename) Maine
2. (Professions) Marine Engineer
3. (Nautical Terms) Marine Engineer
4. (Professions) Mechanical Engineer
5. (Mechanical Engineering) Mechanical Engineer
6. (Christian Churches, other) Methodist Episcopal
7. (Professions) Mining Engineer
8. (Mining & Quarrying) Mining Engineer
9. (Languages) Middle English
10. (Historical Terms) Middle English
11. (in titles) Most Excellent
12. (Pathology) myalgic encephalopathy

me

(mi)

pron.
1. the objective case of I, used as a direct or indirect object: They asked me to the party. Give me your hand.
2. (used instead of the pronoun I in the predicate after the verb to be): It's me.
3. (used instead of the pronoun my before a gerund or present participle): Did you hear about me getting promoted?
adj.
4. of or involving an obsessive interest in one's own satisfaction: the me decade.
[before 900; Middle English me, Old English (dat. and acc. singular); c. Dutch mij, Old High German mir]
usage: The traditional rule is that personal pronouns after the verb to be take the nominative case (I; she; he; we; they). Some 400 years ago, me and other objective pronouns (him; her; us; them) began to replace the subjective forms after be. Today, such constructions - It's me. That's him. It must be them - are almost universal in informal speech. In formal speech and in edited writing, however, the subjective forms are used: It must be they. The figure at the window had been she, not her husband. The objective forms have also replaced the subjective forms in speech in such constructions as Me neither. Who, them? and frequently in comparisons after as or than: She's no faster than him at climbing. Another traditional rule is that gerunds, being verb forms functioning as nouns, must be preceded by the possessive pronoun (my; your; her; its; their; etc.): The landlord objected to my (not me) having a dog. In practice, however, both objective and possessive forms appear before gerunds, the possessive being more common in formal, edited writing, the objective more common in informal writing and speech. See also than.

ME

1. Maine.
2. Middle East.
3. Middle English.

me

1. 'me'

Me can be the object of a verb or preposition. You use me to refer to yourself.

Sara told me about her new job.
He looked at me curiously.

Be Careful!
In standard English, 'me' is not used as the indirect object of a sentence when 'I' is the subject. Don't say, for example, 'I got me a drink'. Say 'I got myself a drink'.

I poured myself a cup of tea.
I had set myself a time limit of two hours.

In conversation, people sometimes use me as part of the subject of a sentence.

Me and my dad argue a lot.
Me and Marcus are leaving.

Be Careful!
Don't use 'me' as part of the subject of a sentence in formal or written English. Use I.

My sister and I were very disappointed with the service.
Brad and I got engaged last year.
2. 'it's me'

If you are asked 'Who is it?', you can say 'It's me', or just 'Me'.

'Who is it?' – 'It's me, Frank.'
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.me - a state in New EnglandME - a state in New England    
Acadia National Park - a national park in Maine showing marine erosion and glaciation; includes seashore and also the highest point on the Atlantic coast
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
New England - a region of northeastern United States comprising Maine and New Hampshire and Vermont and Massachusetts and Rhode Island and Connecticut
Augusta, capital of Maine - the capital of the state of Maine
Bangor - a town in east central Maine on the Penobscot River
Brunswick - a university town in southwestern Maine
Lewiston - a town in southwestern Maine to the north of Portland
Orono - a university town in east central Maine on the Penobscot River to the north of Bangor
Portland - largest city in Maine in the southwestern corner of the state
Penobscot River, Penobscot - a river in central Maine flowing into Penobscot Bay
Saint John River, St. John River, Saint John, St. John - a river that rises in Maine and flows northeastward through New Brunswick to empty into the Bay of Fundy
Translations
إليَّإياي: ضَمير المَفعول بِه العاقِلنيي
emme
mněmnoumůj
migminjeg
mimiamin
meyoconmigo (after prep)
minäminuaminunminutmun
mene
engemnekemközépangol
私に私へ私を
나를
manmanemanęsmanimi
armaniesmanmani
mamňa
jaz
migmig självminminamitt
ฉัน
мені
tôitựcho mìnhcủa tôimình

me

1 [miː] PRON
1. (direct/indirect object) → me; (after prep) →
he loves meme quiere
look at me!¡mírame!
could you lend me your pen?¿me prestas tu bolígrafo?
without mesin mí
come with meven conmigo
like mecomo yo
dear me!¡vaya!
2. (emphatic, in comparisons, after verb "to be") → yo
who, me?¿quién, yo?
what, me?¿cómo, yo?
he's taller than mees más alto que yo
it's mesoy yo
it's me, Paul (identifying self) → soy Paul

me

2 [miː] N (Mus) → mi m

ME

[ˌɛmˈiː]
n abbr
(= chronic fatigue syndrome) (=myalgic encephalomyelitis) → encéphalomyélite f myalgique
(US) (=medical examiner) → médecin mf légiste
abbr (US) (=Maine)

me

[miː](STRONG) [mi] pron
(= object of verb) → me, m' before verb starting with a vowel
Could you lend me your pen? → Est-ce que tu peux me prêter ton stylo?
Can you tell me the way to the station? → Est-ce que vous pouvez m'indiquer le chemin de la gare?
Can you help me? → Est-ce que tu peux m'aider?
He heard me → Il m'a entendu.
(in emphatic position)moi
Look at me! → Regarde-moi!
Wait for me! → Attends-moi!
Come with me! → Suivez-moi!
it's me → c'est moi
me too! → moi aussi!
excuse me! → excusez-moi!
(following preposition)moi
Is it for me? → C'est pour moi?
She's older than me → Elle est plus âgée que moi.
You're after me → Vous êtes après moi.

me

pron
(dir obj, with prep +acc) → mich; (indir obj, with prep +dat) → mir; with my books about memit meinen Büchern um mich herum; he’s older than meer ist älter als ich
(emph)ich; who, me?wer, ich?; it’s meich bins

me

[miː] pers pron
a. (direct, unstressed) → mi, m' + vowel or silent 'h'; (stressed) → me
he can hear me → mi sente
he heard me → mi ha or m'ha sentito
he heard ME! → ha sentito ME!
b. (indirect) → mi, m'+ vowel or silent 'h'
he gave me the money, he gave the money to me → mi ha or m'ha dato i soldi
he gave them to me → me li ha dati
give them to me → dammeli
c. (stressed, after prep) → me
it's for me → è per me
without me → senza (di) me
it's me → sono io

me

(miː) pronoun
(used as the object of a verb or preposition and sometimes instead of I) the word used by a speaker or writer when referring to himself. He hit me; Give that to me; It's me; He can go with John and me.

me

إليَّ mig mich με me minä moi mene mi 私を 나를 mij meg mnie me мне, меня, мной mig ฉัน ben tôi

me

pron. me, mí;
Come with ___Venga, ven conmigo;
The doctor is going to see ___El doctor me va a ver;
The medicine is for ___La medicina es para mí.