meadow


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mead·ow

 (mĕd′ō)
n.
A tract of grassland, either in its natural state or used as pasture or for growing hay.

[Middle English medwe, medoue, from Old English mǣdwe, oblique case of mǣd; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

mead′ow·y adj.

meadow

(ˈmɛdəʊ)
n
1. (Physical Geography) an area of grassland, often used for hay or for grazing of animals
2. (Physical Geography) a low-lying piece of grassland, often boggy and near a river
[Old English mædwe, from mǣd mead2; related to māwan to mow1]
ˈmeadowy adj

mead•ow

(ˈmɛd oʊ)

n.
a limited, relatively flat area of low vegetation dominated by grasses.
[before 1000; Middle English medwe, Old English mǣdw-, oblique s. of mǣd mead2]
mead′ow•less, adj.
mead′ow•y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meadow - a field where grass or alfalfa are grown to be made into haymeadow - a field where grass or alfalfa are grown to be made into hay
grassland - land where grass or grasslike vegetation grows and is the dominant form of plant life

meadow

noun field, pasture, grassland, ley, lea (poetic) Try turning your lawn into a flower meadow.
Translations
مرجمَرْج، أرض مُعْشَوْشِبَهمَرْعَى
ливада
louka
eng
niitty
livada
rétkaszáló
engi
牧草地
목초지
pļava
lúka
travnik
äng
ทุ่งหญ้า
bãi cỏ

meadow

[ˈmedəʊ] Nprado m, pradera f; (esp water meadow) → vega f

meadow

[ˈmɛdəʊ] nprairie f, pré m

meadow

nWiese f, → Weide f; in the meadowauf der Wiese or Weide

meadow

:
meadowland
nWeideland nt
meadowlark
nWiesenstärling m
meadowsweet
nMädesüß nt

meadow

[ˈmɛdəʊ] nprato, pascolo

meadow

(ˈmedəu) noun
(often in plural) a field of grass, usually on low ground. There were cows in the meadow.

meadow

مَرْعَى louka eng Wiese λιβάδι prado niitty prairie livada prato 牧草地 목초지 weide eng łąka campina, prado луг äng ทุ่งหญ้า çayır bãi cỏ 草地
References in classic literature ?
I read in PILGRIM'S PROGRESS today how, after many troubles, christian and Hopeful came to a pleasant green meadow where lilies bloomed all year round, and there they rested happily, as we do now, before they went on to their journey's end," answered Beth, adding, as she slipped out of her father's arms and went to the instrument, "It's singing time now, and I want to be in my old place.
Without looking back, the old man had hurried down the hillside and across a meadow, leaving George Willard perplexed and frightened upon the grassy slope.
On Sunday morning I rose early and got out of Black Hawk while the dew was still heavy on the long meadow grasses.
The hot wind beating in my face made me think--without any connection that I can trace of a summer day in Kentucky, of a meadow that seemed as big as the ocean to the very little girl walking through the grass, which was higher than her waist.
As the enraptured Ichabod fancied all this, and as he rolled his great green eyes over the fat meadow lands, the rich fields of wheat, of rye, of buckwheat, and Indian corn, and the orchards burdened with ruddy fruit, which surrounded the warm tenement of Van Tassel, his heart yearned after the damsel who was to inherit these domains, and his imagination expanded with the idea, how they might be readily turned into cash, and the money invested in immense tracts of wild land, and shingle palaces in the wilderness.
True, they rather order me about some, and make me jump from spar to spar, like a grasshopper in a May meadow.
The first place that I can well remember was a large pleasant meadow with a pond of clear water in it.
And now he felt like a bird lifted up and borne away upon a gale; he stopped and stared at each new sight of wonder--at a herd of cows, and a meadow full of daisies, at hedgerows set thick with June roses, at little birds singing in the trees.
I can easily walk ten, fifteen, twenty, any number of miles, commencing at my own door, without going by any house, without crossing a road except where the fox and the mink do: first along by the river, and then the brook, and then the meadow and the woodside.
We were crossing a vast meadow by way of short-cut, and I was musing absently, hearing nothing, seeing nothing, when Sandy suddenly interrupted a re- mark which she had begun that morning, with the cry:
The plaintive song begins to well forth and float away over meadow and river--the cross-bow is slowly raised to position, a steady aim is taken, the bolt flies straight to the mark--the figure sinks down, still singing, the knight takes the wool out of his ears, and recognizes the old ballad--too late
By this time he was far down Meadow Lane, and the bell for school to "take up" tinkled faintly upon his ear.