meagre


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mea·ger

also mea·gre  (mē′gər)
adj.
1. Deficient in quantity, fullness, or extent; scanty.
2. Deficient in richness, fertility, or vigor; feeble: the meager soil of an eroded plain.
3. Having little flesh; lean.

[Middle English megre, thin, from Old French, from Latin macer; see māk- in Indo-European roots.]

mea′ger·ly adv.
mea′ger·ness n.

meagre

(ˈmiːɡə) or

meager

adj
1. deficient in amount, quality, or extent
2. thin or emaciated
3. lacking in richness or strength
[C14: from Old French maigre, from Latin macer lean, poor]
ˈmeagrely, ˈmeagerly adv
ˈmeagreness, ˈmeagerness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.meagre - deficient in amount or quality or extentmeagre - deficient in amount or quality or extent; "meager resources"; "meager fare"
scarce - deficient in quantity or number compared with the demand; "fresh vegetables were scarce during the drought"
minimal, minimum - the least possible; "needed to enforce minimal standards"; "her grades were minimal"; "minimum wage"; "a minimal charge for the service"
insufficient, deficient - of a quantity not able to fulfill a need or requirement; "insufficient funds"

meagre

Translations
هَزيل، ضئيل
hubenýskrovný
ringe
magur; rÿr, fátæklegur
skurdumasskurdusskurdžiai
nepietiekamsvājš

meagre

meager (US) [ˈmiːgəʳ] ADJ [amount, salary, rations] → escaso, exiguo
he eked out a meagre existence as a labourera duras penas se ganaba la vida trabajando de peón
his salary is a meagre £350 a monthgana unas míseras 350 libras al mes

meagre

[ˈmiːgər] (British) meager (US) adj [supply, resources, pay rise] → maigre before n

meagre

, (US) meager
adj
spärlich; amount, crowdkläglich; mealdürftig, kärglich; to eke out a meagre existenceein kümmerliches Dasein fristen; he earns a meagre £500 a monther verdient magere or mickrige (inf)£ 500 im Monat
(liter: = lean) → hager

meagre

meager (Am) [ˈmiːgəʳ] adjmagro/a

meagre

(American) meager (ˈmiːgə) adjective
poor or not enough. meagre earnings.
ˈmeagrely adverb
ˈmeagreness noun
References in classic literature ?
Meagre, indeed, and cold, was the sympathy that a transgressor might look for, from such bystanders, at the scaffold.
Men may seem detestable as joint stock-companies and nations; knaves, fools, and murderers there may be; men may have mean and meagre faces; but man, in the ideal, is so noble and so sparkling, such a grand and glowing creature, that over any ignominious blemish in him all his fellows should run to throw their costliest robes.
If the only whales that thus sank were old, meagre, and broken-hearted creatures, their pads of lard diminished and all their bones heavy and rheumatic; then you might with some reason assert that this sinking is caused by an uncommon specific gravity in the fish so sinking, consequent upon this absence of buoyant matter in him.
Fearful, however, of losing this first and only opportunity of relieving my grief by imparting it, I, after a disturbed pause, contrived to frame a meagre, though, as far as it went, true response.
The butcher and the porkman painted up, only the leanest scrags of meat; the baker, the coarsest of meagre loaves.
Here he produced a decanter of curiously light wine, and a block of curiously heavy cake, and administered instalments of those dainties to the young people: at the same time, sending out a meagre servant to offer a glass of something to the postboy, who answered that he thanked the gentleman, but if it was the same tap as he had tasted before, he had rather not.
Not that it was one of those barren parishes lying on the outskirts of civilization--inhabited by meagre sheep and thinly-scattered shepherds: on the contrary, it lay in the rich central plain of what we are pleased to call Merry England, and held farms which, speaking from a spiritual point of view, paid highly-desirable tithes.
It seems that, after all his deadly menaces against the Abbot of Saint Edmund's, Athelstane's spirit of revenge, what between the natural indolent kindness of his own disposition, what through the prayers of his mother Edith, attached, like most ladies, (of the period,) to the clerical order, had terminated in his keeping the Abbot and his monks in the dungeons of Coningsburgh for three days on a meagre diet.
There was a meagre portico of four columns, painted red, and a plain pediment, painted yellow.
The first man I saw was of a meagre aspect, with sooty hands and face, his hair and beard long, ragged, and singed in several places.
He made no answer, but sat down to his meagre meal.
Our house was perpetually surrounded by some of those unhappy people, whom want had compelled to abandon their habitations, and whose pale cheeks and meagre bodies were undeniable proofs of their misery and distress.