meagre


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mea·ger

also mea·gre  (mē′gər)
adj.
1. Deficient in quantity, fullness, or extent; scanty.
2. Deficient in richness, fertility, or vigor; feeble: the meager soil of an eroded plain.
3. Having little flesh; lean.

[Middle English megre, thin, from Old French, from Latin macer; see māk- in Indo-European roots.]

mea′ger·ly adv.
mea′ger·ness n.

meagre

(ˈmiːɡə) or

meager

adj
1. deficient in amount, quality, or extent
2. thin or emaciated
3. lacking in richness or strength
[C14: from Old French maigre, from Latin macer lean, poor]
ˈmeagrely, ˈmeagerly adv
ˈmeagreness, ˈmeagerness n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.meagre - deficient in amount or quality or extentmeagre - deficient in amount or quality or extent; "meager resources"; "meager fare"
scarce - deficient in quantity or number compared with the demand; "fresh vegetables were scarce during the drought"
minimal, minimum - the least possible; "needed to enforce minimal standards"; "her grades were minimal"; "minimum wage"; "a minimal charge for the service"
insufficient, deficient - of a quantity not able to fulfill a need or requirement; "insufficient funds"

meagre

Translations
هَزيل، ضئيل
hubenýskrovný
ringe
magur; rÿr, fátæklegur
skurdumasskurdusskurdžiai
nepietiekamsvājš

meagre

meager (US) [ˈmiːgəʳ] ADJ [amount, salary, rations] → escaso, exiguo
he eked out a meagre existence as a labourera duras penas se ganaba la vida trabajando de peón
his salary is a meagre £350 a monthgana unas míseras 350 libras al mes

meagre

[ˈmiːgər] (British) meager (US) adj [supply, resources, pay rise] → maigre before n

meagre

, (US) meager
adj
spärlich; amount, crowdkläglich; mealdürftig, kärglich; to eke out a meagre existenceein kümmerliches Dasein fristen; he earns a meagre £500 a monther verdient magere or mickrige (inf)£ 500 im Monat
(liter: = lean) → hager

meagre

meager (Am) [ˈmiːgəʳ] adjmagro/a

meagre

(American) meager (ˈmiːgə) adjective
poor or not enough. meagre earnings.
ˈmeagrely adverb
ˈmeagreness noun
References in classic literature ?
Their meagre physical experiences, plus their meagre intellectual experiences, made a negative sum so vast that it overbalanced their wholesome morality and healthful sports.
He was a pale, simple-looking man, of a spare and meagre habit, and sat among his flowers and beehives, smoking his pipe, in the little porch before his door.
As the journals, on which I chiefly depended, had been kept by men of business, intent upon the main object of the enterprise, and but little versed in science, or curious about matters not immediately bearing upon their interest, and as they were written often in moments of fatigue or hurry, amid the inconveniences of wild encampments, they were often meagre in their details, furnishing hints to provoke rather than narratives to satisfy inquiry.
The name says, indeed, so exactly and so fully what they are that little remains for their bibliographer to add beyond the meagre historical detail here given.
Now, I am seldom out on a really grassy wicket for such a meagre score, and as David and I changed places without a word, there was a cheery look on his face that I found very galling.
Men may seem detestable as joint stock-companies and nations; knaves, fools, and murderers there may be; men may have mean and meagre faces; but man, in the ideal, is so noble and so sparkling, such a grand and glowing creature, that over any ignominious blemish in him all his fellows should run to throw their costliest robes.
And now the sun went quite down; the gloomy night came; the owl flew into a bush; and a moment after the old fairy came forth pale and meagre, with staring eyes, and a nose and chin that almost met one another.
Here he had nailed up shelves for his books, built himself a box-sofa out of boards and a mattress, laid out his papers on a kitchen-table, hung on the rough plaster wall an engraving of Abraham Lincoln and a calendar with "Thoughts from the Poets," and tried, with these meagre properties, to produce some likeness to the study of a "minister" who had been kind to him and lent him books when he was at Worcester.
He was a small man to begin with; and upon his meagre frame was deposited an even more strikingly meagre head.
The meagre herbage of the prairie, promised nothing, in favour of a hard and unyielding soil, over which the wheels of the vehicles rattled as lightly as if they travelled on a beaten road; neither wagons nor beasts making any deeper impression, than to mark that bruised and withered grass, which the cattle plucked, from time to time, and as often rejected, as food too sour, for even hunger to render palatable.