mean sea level


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mean sea level

n.
The average level of the ocean's surface, calculated as the arithmetical mean of hourly tide levels taken over an extended period and used as the standard for determining terrestrial and atmospheric elevations and ocean depths.

mean sea level

n
(Surveying) (in the UK) the sea level used by the Ordnance Survey as a datum level, determined at Newlyn in Cornwall. See sea level

mean sea level

The average height of the surface of the sea for all stages of the tide; used as a reference for elevations. Also called MSL.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rising mean sea levels are already magnifying the frequency and severity of extreme sea levels, and experts predict that by the end of the century, coastal flooding may be among the costliest impacts of climate change in some regions.
Measure half-way between the two, and voila, you've got your local mean sea level.
Mean sea level, the halfway mark between high and low tides, is measured by a gauge at Newlyn in Cornwall.
The IPCC projected that the global mean sea level would rise by between 40 and 63 cm by the end of this century, depending on how much heat-trapping carbon gases are emitted.
The planned total depth is 3,050 metres below mean sea level and the well will be drilled using the drilling rig, Bredford Dolphin.
With the mean sea level on Indian coasts expected to rise by up to 80 cm by year 2100, the Environment Ministry is initiating a study to record the impact of black elemental carbon, emitted due to the combustion of fossil fuels, on the amount of glacial melt in the Indian Himalayas.
6 metres above mean sea level in the Cardiff area, and that's without a storm surge
Measuring sea level is increasingly important in climate research, and a rising mean sea level is one of the most tangible consequences of climate change.
27, shows that human influence has been detected in the warming of the atmosphere and the ocean, in changes in the global water cycle, in reductions in snow and ice, in global mean sea level rise and in changes in some climate extremes.
Our assessment of the science finds that the atmosphere and ocean have warmed, the amount of snow and ice has diminished, the global mean sea level has risen and the concentrations of greenhouse gases have increased," said Qin Dahe, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group I.
Mean sea level at a given position is defined as the height of the sea surface averaged over a period of time, such as a month or a year, long enough that fluctuations caused by tide and waves are largely removed.
The results suggest that in addition to the effect of eustatic rise in mean sea level and its partial compensation by isostatic land uplift, the water level rose by up to 6 cm near the Estonian coast during 1950-2002, probably due to changes in wind climate.