meander


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me·an·der

 (mē-ăn′dər)
intr.v. me·an·dered, me·an·der·ing, me·an·ders
1. To follow a winding and turning course: Streams tend to meander through level land.
2. To move aimlessly and idly without fixed direction: vagabonds meandering through life. See Synonyms at wander.
3. To speak or write in sustained fashion on a number of loosely connected topics.
4. To be directed in various directions or at multiple objects: His gaze meandered over the church's façade.
n.
1. often meanders A bend, turn, or winding, as of a stream or path.
2. A portion, side trip, or episode in a longer journey.
3. A passage on a subtopic or digression in a longer piece of discourse.
4. An ornamental pattern of winding or intertwining lines, used in art and architecture.

[From Latin maeander, circuitous windings, from Greek maiandros, after Maiandros, the Maeander River in Phrygia, noted for its windings.]

me·an′der·er n.
me·an′der·ing·ly adv.
me·an′drous (-drəs) adj.

meander

(mɪˈændə)
vb (intr)
1. to follow a winding course
2. to wander without definite aim or direction
n
3. (often plural) a curve or bend, as in a river
4. (often plural) a winding course or movement
5. (Architecture) an ornamental pattern, esp as used in ancient Greek architecture
[C16: from Latin maeander, from Greek Maiandros the River Maeander; see Menderes (sense 1)]
meˈanderer n
meˈandering adj
meˈanderingly adv
meˈandrous adj

Meander

(miːˈændə)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a variant spelling of Maeander
2. (Placename) a variant spelling of Maeander

me•an•der

(miˈæn dər)

v.i.
1. to proceed by a winding or indirect course.
2. to wander aimlessly; ramble.
n.
3. a winding path or course.
[1570–80; < Latin maeander < Greek maíandros a winding, generic use of Maíandros the Menderes River]

Me•an•der

(miˈæn dər)

n.
ancient name of the Menderes (def. 1).

meander


Past participle: meandered
Gerund: meandering

Imperative
meander
meander
Present
I meander
you meander
he/she/it meanders
we meander
you meander
they meander
Preterite
I meandered
you meandered
he/she/it meandered
we meandered
you meandered
they meandered
Present Continuous
I am meandering
you are meandering
he/she/it is meandering
we are meandering
you are meandering
they are meandering
Present Perfect
I have meandered
you have meandered
he/she/it has meandered
we have meandered
you have meandered
they have meandered
Past Continuous
I was meandering
you were meandering
he/she/it was meandering
we were meandering
you were meandering
they were meandering
Past Perfect
I had meandered
you had meandered
he/she/it had meandered
we had meandered
you had meandered
they had meandered
Future
I will meander
you will meander
he/she/it will meander
we will meander
you will meander
they will meander
Future Perfect
I will have meandered
you will have meandered
he/she/it will have meandered
we will have meandered
you will have meandered
they will have meandered
Future Continuous
I will be meandering
you will be meandering
he/she/it will be meandering
we will be meandering
you will be meandering
they will be meandering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been meandering
you have been meandering
he/she/it has been meandering
we have been meandering
you have been meandering
they have been meandering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been meandering
you will have been meandering
he/she/it will have been meandering
we will have been meandering
you will have been meandering
they will have been meandering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been meandering
you had been meandering
he/she/it had been meandering
we had been meandering
you had been meandering
they had been meandering
Conditional
I would meander
you would meander
he/she/it would meander
we would meander
you would meander
they would meander
Past Conditional
I would have meandered
you would have meandered
he/she/it would have meandered
we would have meandered
you would have meandered
they would have meandered

meander

A curve in a river that swings in wide loops from side to side.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meander - a bend or curve, as in a stream or rivermeander - a bend or curve, as in a stream or river
oxbow - a U-shaped curve in a stream
stream, watercourse - a natural body of running water flowing on or under the earth
curve, curved shape - the trace of a point whose direction of motion changes
2.meander - an aimless amble on a winding course
amble, stroll, saunter, perambulation, promenade - a leisurely walk (usually in some public place)
Verb1.meander - to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular coursemeander - to move or cause to move in a sinuous, spiral, or circular course; "the river winds through the hills"; "the path meanders through the vineyards"; "sometimes, the gout wanders through the entire body"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
snake - move along a winding path; "The army snaked through the jungle"
wander - go via an indirect route or at no set pace; "After dinner, we wandered into town"

meander

verb
1. wind, turn, snake, zigzag The river meandered in lazy curves.
2. wander, stroll, stray, ramble, stravaig (Scot. & Northern English dialect) We meandered along the Irish country roads.
3. ramble, rabbit (Brit. informal), rattle, chatter, waffle (Brit. informal), witter (Brit. informal), prattle, natter (Brit. informal), maunder, blether, prate (rare) She meandered on, stopping now and again for a breath.
noun
1. wander, stroll, amble, saunter, mosey (informal) a meander round the shops
2. curve, bend, turn, twist, loop, coil, zigzag The outer bank of a meander in the river.

meander

verb
1. To move or proceed on a repeatedly curving course:
2. To move about at random, especially over a wide area:
3. To walk at a leisurely pace:
Informal: mosey.
noun
An act of walking, especially for pleasure.Often used in plural:
Translations
يَتَعَرَّج، يَنْعَطِفيَهيم، يَشْرُد
klikatit setoulat se
bugte sig
bolyongkacskaringóz
hlykkjast, bugîastreika
klaidžiotiklydinėti
klaiņotklīstlīkumot
kıvrıla kıvrıla ilerlemekorada burada dolaşmak

meander

[mɪˈændəʳ]
A. VI
1. [river] → serpentear
2. [person] (= roam) → deambular, vagar; (in speech) → divagar
B. Nmeandro m
meanders (fig) → meandros mpl

meander

[miˈændər] vi
(= wind) [river] → serpenter; [road] → serpenter
A stream meandered towards the sea → Un ruisseau serpentait jusqu'à la mer.
[person] → flâner
[speech, conversation, account] → se perdre en méandres

meander

vi (river)sich (dahin)schlängeln, mäandern; (person)wirr sein; (= go off subject)(vom Thema) abschweifen; (walking) → schlendern

meander

[mɪˈændəʳ]
1. nmeandro
2. vi (river) → fare dei meandri; (person) → girovagare (fig) → divagare

meander

(miˈӕndə) verb
1. (of a river) to flow slowly along with many bends and curves. The stream meandered through the meadows.
2. (of people etc) to wander about in various directions. His writing meanders all over the page.
References in classic literature ?
You boys can go there for a general wash-up, rig yourselves up without saying anything, and then meander back careless and easy in your store clothes, just as the stage is coming in, sabe?
The sun sets on some retired meadow, where no house is visible, with all the glory and splendor that it lavishes on cities, and perchance as it has never set before--where there is but a solitary marsh hawk to have his wings gilded by it, or only a musquash looks out from his cabin, and there is some little black-veined brook in the midst of the marsh, just beginning to meander, winding slowly round a decaying stump.
While she was wondering how this could be successfully accomplished, some of the other girls were cogitating as to how they could meander through the four years and come out at the end knowing no more than at the beginning.
Not to meander myself, at present, I will go back to my birth.
It is among these hills that the Delaware takes its rise; and flowing from the limpid lakes and thousand springs of this region the numerous sources of the Susquehanna meander through the valleys until, uniting their streams, they form one of the proudest rivers of the United States.
Her journey back was rather a meander than a march.
There is also a difference between the nobles in their wealth, and the dignity in which they live: for instance, in the number of horses they breed; for this cannot be supported without a large fortune: for which reason, in former times, those cities whose strength consisted in horse became by that means oligarchies; and they used horse in their expeditions against the neighbouring cities; as the Eretrians the Chalcidians, the Magnetians, who lived near the river Meander, and many others in Asia.
But more than all, I wished that old Diogenes, groping so patiently with his lantern, searching so zealously for one solitary honest man in all the world, might meander along and stumble on our party.
He thanked Providence for having sent this happy idea to him; but, as he was preparing to cross the Place, in order to reach the tortuous labyrinth of the city, where meander all those old sister streets, the Rues de la Barillerie, de la Vielle-Draperie, de la Savaterie, de la Juiverie, etc.
I'm tied hand and foot, and I can't get up and meander over green pastures.
334-345) And Tethys bare to Ocean eddying rivers, Nilus, and Alpheus, and deep-swirling Eridanus, Strymon, and Meander, and the fair stream of Ister, and Phasis, and Rhesus, and the silver eddies of Achelous, Nessus, and Rhodius, Haliacmon, and Heptaporus, Granicus, and Aesepus, and holy Simois, and Peneus, and Hermus, and Caicus fair stream, and great Sangarius, Ladon, Parthenius, Euenus, Ardescus, and divine Scamander.
Out of this lake, which filled the center of a beautiful plain, embellished with groups of beeches and elms, and fed with sheep, issued a river, that for several miles was seen to meander through an amazing variety of meadows and woods till it emptied itself into the sea, with a large arm of which, and an island beyond it, the prospect was closed.