meant


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meant

 (mĕnt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of mean1.

meant

(mɛnt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of mean1

mean1

(min)

v. meant, mean•ing. v.t.
1. to have in mind as one's purpose or intention; intend.
2. to intend for a particular destiny: They were meant for each other.
3. to intend to express or indicate: What do you mean by “perfect” ?
4. to have as its sense or signification; signify.
5. to bring, cause, or produce as a result: Prosperity means peace.
6. to have the value of: Money means everything to them.
v.i.
7. to have specified intentions: We meant well.
[before 900; Middle English menen, Old English mǣnan, c. Old Frisian mēna, Old Saxon mēnian, Old High German meinen]

mean2

(min)

adj. -er, -est.
1. uncharitable; malicious: a mean remark.
2. small-minded; ignoble: mean motives.
3. stingy; miserly.
4. inferior in quality or character.
5. low in status: mean servitors.
6. bad-tempered: a mean horse.
7. excellent; topnotch: plays a mean game of tennis.
[before 900; variant of imene, Old English gemǣne common, inferior, c. Old Frisian mēne, Old High German gimeini, Gothic gamains; compare common]
mean′ness, n.

mean3

(min)

n.
1. Usu., means. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) an agency, instrument, or method used to attain an end.
2. means,
a. available resources, esp. money.
b. considerable financial resources: a person of means.
3. something midway between two extremes.
4.
a. a quantity having a value intermediate between the values of other quantities; an average, esp. the arithmetic mean.
b. either the second or third term in a proportion of four terms.
5. the middle term in a syllogism.
adj.
6. occupying a middle position or intermediate place.
Idioms:
1. by all means, certainly.
2. by any means, in any way; at all.
3. by means of, by the agency of; through.
4. by no means, not at all.
[1300–50; Middle English mene < Anglo-French, Old French meen, variant of meien < Latin mediānus; see median]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

meant

adjective supposed, expected, required, intended Parties are meant to be fun.
Translations

meant

[ˈmɛnt]
pt
pp of mean
adj
(= intended) to be meant for → être destiné(e) à
a film meant for adults → un film destiné aux adultes
The tales were never meant for publication → Ces contes n'ont jamais été destinés à la publication.
(= supposed) to be meant to be → être censé(e) être
I was meant to be on holiday → J'étais censé être en vacances.
(= considered) to be meant to be → être censé(e) être
He's meant to be an expert → Il est censé être un expert.
References in classic literature ?
I only meant to change the little bottle for a big one, and I gave all my money to get it, and I'm truly trying not to be selfish any more.
Adolph Myers was meant by nature to be a teacher of youth.
I had lost sight of her altogether, but Jim had found her again after long years, had renewed a friendship that meant a great deal to him, and out of his busy life had set apart time enough to enjoy that friendship.
I know he meant no harm, I never said he did; I know he is not a bad boy.
And everybody went on asking that question, but in vain; for the judge only said he knew what he was talking about, and stopped there; Tom said he hadn't any idea what his uncle meant, and Wilson, whenever he was asked what he thought it meant, parried the question by asking the questioner what HE thought it meant.
Dashwood, however, conforming, as she trusted, to the wishes of that daughter, by whom she then meant in the warmth of her heart to be guided in every thing, met with a look of forced complacency, gave him her hand, and wished him joy.
Certainly I do; and your mistake has been in supposing that an experiment which no few every-day married couples would be only too glad to try, was ever meant for two such love-birds as you.
By freedom is meant, under the present bourgeois conditions of production, free trade, free selling and buying.
Tom meant to reverse this image, but love is proverbially desperate in its figures of speech, and any thing was better than appearing to hesitate.
What I meant to say just now," she added, "was that the French, to my sense, give us only again and again, for ever and ever, the same couple.
His physical strength and agility during the first days of his imprisonment were such that he seemed not to know what fatigue and sickness meant.
There is no doubt but the kindly playwright had his conscience, and meant to make people think as well as laugh.