medal


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med·al

 (mĕd′l)
n.
1. A flat piece of metal stamped with a design or an inscription commemorating an event or a person, often given as an award.
2. A piece of metal stamped with a religious device, used as an object of veneration or commemoration.
v. med·aled, med·al·ing, med·als also med·alled or med·al·ling Informal
v.intr.
To win a medal, as in a sports contest: "We were the first Americans to medal" (Jill Watson).
v.tr.
To award a medal to.

[French médaille, from Old French, from Italian medaglia, coin worth half a denarius, medal, from Vulgar Latin *medālia, coins worth half a denarius, from Late Latin mediālia, little halves, from neuter pl. of mediālis, of the middle, medial; see medial.]

me·dal′lic (mə-dăl′ĭk) adj.

medal

(ˈmɛdəl)
n
a small flat piece of metal bearing an inscription or image, given as an award or commemoration of some outstanding action, event, etc
vb, -als, -alling or -alled, -als, -aling or -aled
1. (tr) to honour with a medal
2. (General Sporting Terms) (intr) informal (in sport) to win a medal
[C16: from French médaille, probably from Italian medaglia, ultimately from Latin metallum metal]
medallic adj

med•al

(ˈmɛd l)

n., v. -aled, -al•ing or (esp. Brit.) -alled, -al•ling. n.
1. a flat piece of metal, often a disk, bearing an inscription or design and issued as a token of commemoration or as a reward for bravery, merit, or the like.
2. a similar object bearing a religious image, as of a saint.
v.i.
3. to receive a medal, esp. in a sporting event: He medaled in three of four races.
[1580–90; earlier medaille < Middle French < Italian medaglia a copper coin « Late Latin mediālia]

medal


Past participle: medalled
Gerund: medalling

Imperative
medal
medal
Present
I medal
you medal
he/she/it medals
we medal
you medal
they medal
Preterite
I medalled
you medalled
he/she/it medalled
we medalled
you medalled
they medalled
Present Continuous
I am medalling
you are medalling
he/she/it is medalling
we are medalling
you are medalling
they are medalling
Present Perfect
I have medalled
you have medalled
he/she/it has medalled
we have medalled
you have medalled
they have medalled
Past Continuous
I was medalling
you were medalling
he/she/it was medalling
we were medalling
you were medalling
they were medalling
Past Perfect
I had medalled
you had medalled
he/she/it had medalled
we had medalled
you had medalled
they had medalled
Future
I will medal
you will medal
he/she/it will medal
we will medal
you will medal
they will medal
Future Perfect
I will have medalled
you will have medalled
he/she/it will have medalled
we will have medalled
you will have medalled
they will have medalled
Future Continuous
I will be medalling
you will be medalling
he/she/it will be medalling
we will be medalling
you will be medalling
they will be medalling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been medalling
you have been medalling
he/she/it has been medalling
we have been medalling
you have been medalling
they have been medalling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been medalling
you will have been medalling
he/she/it will have been medalling
we will have been medalling
you will have been medalling
they will have been medalling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been medalling
you had been medalling
he/she/it had been medalling
we had been medalling
you had been medalling
they had been medalling
Conditional
I would medal
you would medal
he/she/it would medal
we would medal
you would medal
they would medal
Past Conditional
I would have medalled
you would have medalled
he/she/it would have medalled
we would have medalled
you would have medalled
they would have medalled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.medal - an award for winning a championship or commemorating some other eventmedal - an award for winning a championship or commemorating some other event
accolade, honor, laurels, honour, award - a tangible symbol signifying approval or distinction; "an award for bravery"
Congressional Medal of Honor, Medal of Honor - the highest U.S. military decoration awarded for bravery and valor in action `above and beyond the call of duty'
Distinguished Service Medal - a United States military decoration for meritorious service in wartime duty of great responsibility
Distinguished Service Cross - a United States Army decoration for extraordinary heroism against an armed enemy
Navy Cross - a United States Navy decoration for extraordinary heroism against an armed enemy
Distinguished Flying Cross - a United States Air Force decoration for heroism while participating in an aerial flight
Air Medal - a United States Air Force decoration for meritorious achievement while participating in an aerial flight
Silver Star, Silver Star Medal - a United States military decoration for gallantry in action
Bronze Star, Bronze Star Medal - a United States military decoration awarded for meritorious service (except in aerial flight)
Order of the Purple Heart, Purple Heart - a United States military decoration awarded to any member of the armed forces who is wounded in action
Oak Leaf Cluster - a United States military decoration consisting of bronze or silver oak leaves and acorns awarded to anyone who has won a given medal before
Victoria Cross - a British military decoration for gallantry
Distinguished Conduct Medal - a British military decoration for distinguished conduct in the field
Distinguished Service Order - a British military decoration for special service in action
Croix de Guerre - a French military decoration for gallantry
Medaille Militaire - a French military decoration

medal

noun decoration, order, award, honour, ribbon, gong (Brit. informal) a gold medal
Related words
enthusiast medallist

Medals

Bronze Star (U.S.), Congressional Medal of Honor (U.S.), Croix de Guerre (France), Distinguished Service Cross (U.S.), Distinguished Service Order (English), Gege Cross (English), Iron Cross (German), Légion d'Honneur (France), Legion of Merit (U.S.), Militaire Willemsorde (Dutch), Purple Heart (U.S.), Royal Red Cross (English), Silver Star (U.S.), Victoria Cross (English)

medal

noun
An emblem of honor worn on one's clothing:
Translations
medalje
مِدَالِيَةٌمِداليَه، وِسام
medaile
medalje
medalo
mitali
medalja
éremmedália
minnis-/verîlaunapeningur; orîa
メダル勲章賞牌
메달
medalis
medalininkasmedalis
medaļa
medailleerepenning
medalia
medaila
medalja
medaljaмедаља
medalj
เหรียญ
huy chương

medal

[ˈmedl] Nmedalla f
he deserves a medal for itmerece que le den una medalla por ello

medal

[ˈmɛdəl] nmédaille f
to be given a medal, to be awarded a medal → être décoré(e), recevoir une médaille
He was awarded a medal after rescuing his comrades → Il a été décoré pour avoir sauvé ses camarades., Il a reçu une médaille pour avoir sauvé ses camarades. gold medal, medal-winner

medal

nMedaille f; (= decoration)Orden m

medal

[ˈmɛdl] nmedaglia

medal

(ˈmedl) noun
a piece of metal with a design, inscription etc stamped on it, given as a reward for bravery, long service, excellence etc, or made to celebrate a special occasion. He won a medal in the War.
ˈmedallist , (American) ˈmedalist noun
a person who has won a medal in a competition etc.

medal

مِدَالِيَةٌ medaile medalje Medaille μετάλλιο medalla mitali médaille medalja medaglia メダル 메달 medaille medalje medal medalha медаль medalj เหรียญ madalya huy chương 奖章
References in classic literature ?
To my mother, all my clothes, except the blue apron with pockets--also my likeness, and my medal, with much love.
He did not seem to think that he at all deserved a medal from the Humane and Magnanimous Societies.
This study was exhibited in the Paris Salon of 1879, but did not take any medal; they do not give medals for studies.
In turn he took his place in the reading class and made a botch of it; then in the geography class and turned lakes into mountains, mountains into rivers, and rivers into continents, till chaos was come again; then in the spelling class, and got "turned down," by a succession of mere baby words, till he brought up at the foot and yielded up the pewter medal which he had worn with ostentation for months.
The place he found beyond expression bright, Compar'd with aught on Earth, Medal or Stone; Not all parts like, but all alike informd Which radiant light, as glowing Iron with fire; If mettal, part seemd Gold, part Silver cleer; If stone, Carbuncle most or Chrysolite, Rubie or Topaz, to the Twelve that shon In AARONS Brest-plate, and a stone besides Imagind rather oft then elsewhere seen, That stone, or like to that which here below Philosophers in vain so long have sought, In vain, though by thir powerful Art they binde Volatil HERMES, and call up unbound In various shapes old PROTEUS from the Sea, Draind through a Limbec to his Native forme.
I have few equals as a coiner, and if you should require a medal struck to give away for good behavior or the like, I think I could strike one to your satisfaction.
He had been hoisted into a ship at the end of a steam crane and taken for days across the water, and made to carry a mortar on his back in a strange and rocky country very far from India, and had seen the Emperor Theodore lying dead in Magdala, and had come back again in the steamer entitled, so the soldiers said, to the Abyssinian War medal.
To Richardson in particular he extended the most valuable assistance and advice, and that student, encouraged by the praise of the demonstrator, burned high with ambitious hopes, and saw the medal already in his grasp.
There was likewise a silver coronation medal of George the Third.
Nine wounds I bear; a medal and four clasps and the medal of an Order, for my captains, who are now generals, remembered me when the Kaisar-i-Hind had accomplished fifty years of her reign, and all the land rejoiced.
Naini Tal had sent down her contingent with all speed; the lathering ponies of the Dalhousie Road staggered into Pathankot, taxed to the full stretch of their strength; while from cloudy Darjiling the Calcutta Mail whirled up the last straggler of the little army that was to fight a fight, in which was neither medal nor honour for the winning, against an enemy none other than "the sickness that destroyeth in the noonday.
After I had graduated I continued to devote myself to research, occupying a minor position in King's College Hospital, and I was fortunate enough to excite considerable interest by my research into the pathology of catalepsy, and finally to win the Bruce Pinkerton prize and medal by the monograph on nervous lesions to which your friend has just alluded.