mediated

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me·di·ate

 (mē′dē-āt′)
v. me·di·at·ed, me·di·at·ing, me·di·ates
v.tr.
1. To resolve or settle (differences) by working with all the conflicting parties: mediate a labor-management dispute.
2. To bring about (a settlement, for example) by working with all the conflicting parties.
3.
a. To effect or convey as an intermediate agent or mechanism: chemicals that mediate inflammation.
b. Physics To convey (a force) between subatomic particles.
v.intr.
1. To work with two or more disputants in order to bring about an agreement, settlement, or compromise.
2. To settle or reconcile differences: "[George] Eliot's effort to mediate between the conflicting demands of representation and readability in the [novel's] dialect usage" (Carol A. Martin).
3. To have a relation to two differing persons, groups, or things: psychological processes that mediate between stimulus and response.
adj. (-ĭt)
1. Acting through, involving, or dependent on an intervening agency.
2. Being in a middle position.

[Late Latin mediāre, mediāt-, to be in the middle, from Latin medius, middle; see medhyo- in Indo-European roots.]

me′di·ate·ly (-ĭt-lē) adv.
me′di·a′tion (-ā′shən) n.
me′di·a′tive, me′di·a·to′ry (mē′dē-ə-tôr′ē) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.mediated - acting or brought about through an intervening agencymediated - acting or brought about through an intervening agency; "the mediated settlement brought satisfaction to both sides"
mediate - acting through or dependent on an intervening agency; "the disease spread by mediate as well as direct contact"
References in periodicals archive ?
Racial-sexual violence, these articles suggest, could not happen "here," not outside Canadian urban spaces, where violence is mediatedly linked to racialized populations, and especially not in pristine white spaces like Victoria (Razack 2002; Wortley 2002; Lee 2006; Teelucksingh 2006).
The encounter with the other's reading occurs not in their language, but mediatedly, in the language of the other--and therefore always other-ingly.
Rather than being represented mediatedly, others are only made to represent themselves through the gaze of the researcher whose authority remains unchecked.