medick

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med·ick

 (mĕd′ĭk)
n.
Variant of medic1.

medick

(ˈmɛdɪk) or

medic

n
(Plants) any small leguminous plant of the genus Medicago, such as black medick or sickle medick, having yellow or purple flowers and trifoliate leaves
[C15: from Latin mēdica, from Greek mēdikē (poa) Median (grass), a type of clover]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.medick - any of several Old World herbs of the genus Medicago having small flowers and trifoliate compound leavesmedick - any of several Old World herbs of the genus Medicago having small flowers and trifoliate compound leaves
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Medicago, Medicago - a genus of herbs that resemble clover
Medicago arborea, moon trefoil - evergreen shrub of southern European highlands having downy foliage and a succession of yellow flowers throughout the summer followed by curious snail-shaped pods
Medicago falcata, sickle alfalfa, sickle lucerne, sickle medick - European medic naturalized in North America having yellow flowers and sickle-shaped pods
Calvary clover, Medicago echinus, Medicago intertexta - an annual of the Mediterranean area having spiny seed pods and leaves with dark spots
black medick, hop clover, Medicago lupulina, nonesuch clover, yellow trefoil - prostrate European herb with small yellow flowers and curved black pods; naturalized in North America
alfalfa, lucerne, Medicago sativa - important European leguminous forage plant with trifoliate leaves and blue-violet flowers grown widely as a pasture and hay crop
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Charity director Ashley Medicks lost his licence last month after failing a breathalyser near Dalbeattie.
Ashley Medicks, 62, of Kirkgunzeon, also pleaded guilty, to driving on High Street, Dalbeattie, on April 21 with a reading of 32mg.
John Reynolds in A Discourse upon Prodigious ABSTINENCE writes that 'Divines, Medicks, Historians, yea, Poets and Legenders have presented the Learned World with a great variety of wonderful Abstinents'.