medieval

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me·di·e·val

also me·di·ae·val  (mē′dē-ē′vəl, mĕd′ē-, mĭ-dē′vəl)
adj.
1. also Medieval
a. Relating or belonging to the Middle Ages.
b. Of or relating to a historical period roughly coinciding with the European Middle Ages and characterized by feudal or aristocratic social structures, as in Japan or China.
2.
a. Suggestive of the Middle Ages, as in being hierarchical or cruel.
b. Informal Old-fashioned; unenlightened: parents with a medieval attitude toward dating.

[From New Latin medium aevum, the middle age : Latin, neuter of medius, middle; see medhyo- in Indo-European roots + Latin aevum, age; see aiw- in Indo-European roots.]

me′di·e′val·ly adv.

medieval

(ˌmɛdɪˈiːvəl) or

mediaeval

adj
1. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or in the style of the Middle Ages
2. informal old-fashioned; primitive
[C19: from New Latin medium aevum the middle age. See medium, age]
ˌmediˈevally, ˌmediˈaevally adv

me•di•e•val

or me•di•ae•val

(ˌmi diˈi vəl, ˌmɛd i-, ˌmɪd i-, mɪdˈi vəl)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the Middle Ages.
[1820–30; < New Latin medi(um)aev(um) the middle age + -al1. See medium, age]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.medieval - relating to or belonging to the Middle Agesmedieval - relating to or belonging to the Middle Ages; "Medieval scholars"; "Medieval times"
2.medieval - as if belonging to the Middle Ages; old-fashioned and unenlightened; "a medieval attitude toward dating"
nonmodern - not modern; of or characteristic of an earlier time
3.medieval - characteristic of the time of chivalry and knighthood in the Middle Agesmedieval - characteristic of the time of chivalry and knighthood in the Middle Ages; "chivalric rites"; "the knightly years"
past - earlier than the present time; no longer current; "time past"; "his youth is past"; "this past Thursday"; "the past year"

medieval

adjective (Informal) old-fashioned, antique, primitive, obsolete, out-of-date, archaic, prehistoric, antiquated, anachronistic, antediluvian, unenlightened, out of the ark There can be no excuse for these medieval methods.
Translations
středověký
middelalderligmiddelalder-
keskiaikainen
srednjovjekovni
középkori
miîalda-, frá/sem lÿtur aî miîöldum
中世の
중세의
viduramžių
viduslaiku
middeleeuwermiddeleeuws
srednjeveški
medeltida
เกี่ยวกับยุคกลาง
Orta Çağa aitortaçağ
thuộc thời Trung cổ

medieval

[ˌmedɪˈiːvəl] ADJmedieval

medieval

[ˌmɛdiˈiːvəl] mediaeval (British) adjmédiéval(e)

medieval

adj (lit, fig)mittelalterlich; in medieval timesim Mittelalter; it’s positively medieval (practice, attitude)es ist wie im Mittelalter

medieval

[ˌmɛdɪˈiːvl] adjmedievale, del medio evo
medieval studies → medievalistica sg

medieval,

mediaeval

(mediˈiːvəl) , ((American) mi:-) adjective
of, or belonging to, the Middle Ages. medieval plays/music.

medieval

مُتَعَلِقٌ بِالْقُرُونِ الْوُسْطَى středověký middelalderlig mittelalterlich μεσαιωνικός medieval keskiaikainen médiéval srednjovjekovni medievale 中世の 중세의 middeleeuws middelaldersk średniowieczny medieval средневековый medeltida เกี่ยวกับยุคกลาง ortaçağ thuộc thời Trung cổ 中世纪的
References in periodicals archive ?
Medievalists are increasingly turning their attention to modern interpretations, representations, repurposings, and fabrications of the Middle Ages, not least those accounts of the medieval past that shaped the field at its inception in the nineteenth century.
A specialist in the northwest of Ireland during the early Middle Ages, Lacey begs pardon from fellow medievalists for the secondary explanations he includes to make his account of the city of Derry comprehensible and enjoyable to general readers as well.
Having read her excellent Getting Medieval: Sexualities and Communities, Pre- and Postmodern (1999), I also knew that Dinshaw was an expert at elucidating vital connections between medieval and contemporary culture, defying the popular, politically-correct image of medieval studies as hopelessly irrelevant and of medievalists as doddering relics of elitist academia utterly out of touch with real-world issues.
Most medievalists, though recognizing Gerbert's many strengths, would disagree strongly, noting how much science and learning continued to be valued throughout the Middle Ages.
Scholars devoting their work to the Middle Ages have had to make some noise of late to remind modernists (and particularly theorists) that medievalists have been part of the conversation about modernity for a long time--as long as it has been going on, in fact.
He covers great sweeps of human existence with broad generalisations, borrowing from other medievalists and not crediting them.
Then at Oxford I was fortunate to be taught by some inspiring medievalists.
Reading the Medieval in Early Modern England is an ambitious collaborative essay volume that succeeds both in its specific scholarly aims and in articulating a number of more general intellectual possibilities and desires for medievalists and early modernists concerned with questions of periodization, the temporality of texts and disciplines, the historicity of individual and national identities, and the past of the past.
Distinguished as Blunt was, it was a group of medievalists of the highest calibre--notably Christopher Hohler and George Zarnecki--who largely created the Courtauld's international academic reputation.
The book forms part of a welcome trend among medievalists (one thinks of Bruce Holsinger's The Premodern Condition) which does not simply revise medieval texts in the light of critical theory, but instead reads medieval and post-modern texts side by side, as inevitably and productively implicated in each other.
Establishing a contrast between Lacan and myriad other twentieth-century intellectuals who may be considered medievalists because of their engagement with medieval texts, including Agamben, Arendt, Bataille, and Barthes (a topic Bruce Holsinger covers in The Premodern Condition), Labbie argues that Lacan is a medievalist because "his methodologies follow those established by the medieval scholastic scholars who sought to determine the potential of the human subject to know and represent real universal categories" (2).
The most advanced and motivated students--as well as educated medievalists and adventurous adult readers--should thoroughly enjoy reading this fascinating book.