medieval

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me·di·e·val

also me·di·ae·val  (mē′dē-ē′vəl, mĕd′ē-, mĭ-dē′vəl)
adj.
1. also Medieval
a. Relating or belonging to the Middle Ages.
b. Of or relating to a historical period roughly coinciding with the European Middle Ages and characterized by feudal or aristocratic social structures, as in Japan or China.
2.
a. Suggestive of the Middle Ages, as in being hierarchical or cruel.
b. Informal Old-fashioned; unenlightened: parents with a medieval attitude toward dating.

[From New Latin medium aevum, the middle age : Latin, neuter of medius, middle; see medhyo- in Indo-European roots + Latin aevum, age; see aiw- in Indo-European roots.]

me′di·e′val·ly adv.

medieval

(ˌmɛdɪˈiːvəl) or

mediaeval

adj
1. (Historical Terms) of, relating to, or in the style of the Middle Ages
2. informal old-fashioned; primitive
[C19: from New Latin medium aevum the middle age. See medium, age]
ˌmediˈevally, ˌmediˈaevally adv

me•di•e•val

or me•di•ae•val

(ˌmi diˈi vəl, ˌmɛd i-, ˌmɪd i-, mɪdˈi vəl)

adj.
of, pertaining to, or characteristic of the Middle Ages.
[1820–30; < New Latin medi(um)aev(um) the middle age + -al1. See medium, age]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.medieval - relating to or belonging to the Middle Agesmedieval - relating to or belonging to the Middle Ages; "Medieval scholars"; "Medieval times"
2.medieval - as if belonging to the Middle Ages; old-fashioned and unenlightened; "a medieval attitude toward dating"
nonmodern - not modern; of or characteristic of an earlier time
3.medieval - characteristic of the time of chivalry and knighthood in the Middle Agesmedieval - characteristic of the time of chivalry and knighthood in the Middle Ages; "chivalric rites"; "the knightly years"
past - earlier than the present time; no longer current; "time past"; "his youth is past"; "this past Thursday"; "the past year"

medieval

adjective (Informal) old-fashioned, antique, primitive, obsolete, out-of-date, archaic, prehistoric, antiquated, anachronistic, antediluvian, unenlightened, out of the ark There can be no excuse for these medieval methods.
Translations
středověký
middelalderligmiddelalder-
keskiaikainen
srednjovjekovni
középkori
miîalda-, frá/sem lÿtur aî miîöldum
中世の
중세의
viduramžių
viduslaiku
middeleeuwermiddeleeuws
srednjeveški
medeltida
เกี่ยวกับยุคกลาง
Orta Çağa aitortaçağ
thuộc thời Trung cổ

medieval

[ˌmedɪˈiːvəl] ADJmedieval

medieval

[ˌmɛdiˈiːvəl] mediaeval (British) adjmédiéval(e)

medieval

adj (lit, fig)mittelalterlich; in medieval timesim Mittelalter; it’s positively medieval (practice, attitude)es ist wie im Mittelalter

medieval

[ˌmɛdɪˈiːvl] adjmedievale, del medio evo
medieval studies → medievalistica sg

medieval,

mediaeval

(mediˈiːvəl) , ((American) mi:-) adjective
of, or belonging to, the Middle Ages. medieval plays/music.

medieval

مُتَعَلِقٌ بِالْقُرُونِ الْوُسْطَى středověký middelalderlig mittelalterlich μεσαιωνικός medieval keskiaikainen médiéval srednjovjekovni medievale 中世の 중세의 middeleeuws middelaldersk średniowieczny medieval средневековый medeltida เกี่ยวกับยุคกลาง ortaçağ thuộc thời Trung cổ 中世纪的
References in classic literature ?
In England Chaucer was followed by the medievalizing fifteenth century, but in Italy there was no such interruption.
Even as Rossetti obscures the histories of his speakers, his medievalizing tendencies and tone of regretful longing mean that he is frequently concerned with time gone by.
1) On such sources as Elizabethan and Jacobean drama, 'Graveyard School' poetry, sentimental fiction, Burke's philosophy of the Sublime, Orientalist and medievalizing trends or the German Sturm-und-Drang see, e.
4) Since its publication in 1904, "Oh, Whistle" has tempted critics into extensive analysis, annotation, and commentary, and yet in general the profound intersection of James's professional career with his medievalizing fictions has tended to attract more impressionistic generalizations than detailed consideration.
8) Ultimately, however, Lewis's novel, rather than a genuine "medieval" text, is distinctively medievalizing, revealing, in a way characteristic for Lewis's entire career, a struggle to balance what the author found appealing in the Middle Ages with the peculiar challenges of modernity.
The 19th-century German school of painters known as the Nazarenes, which created medievalizing works on themes of nationalism and Christian idealism, is the subject of this fine study by Grewe (Columbia U.
Nevertheless, Mazzonis's case for Merici's originality and for the medievalizing novelty of the company's rule, although doomed as the churchly climate changed, will engage feminist interest and will reward the attention of a broad readership.
Romantic and Victorian medievalisms now have vast critical bibliographies, and indeed, well-worn scholarly paths exist for those investigating the medievalizing tendencies of all eras from about the mid-eighteenth century onward.
Nor is any mediating principle like Descartes's medievalizing "animal spirits," expected to labor, somehow, while still physical, as the hydramatic transmission linking the corporeal to the incorporeal--an approach that Spinoza, archly tactful or tactfully arch, called too subtle to prove anything but its author's ingenuity.
While he places emphasis on medievalizing as the discursive framework for imagining and remembering this war, he is careful not to set up an opposition and remains sensible to theories of modernity that take into account its hidden but strong connection with primitivism, for which technology was often seen as a paradigm, and the archaic, the time before the emergence of time.
5) This itinerant persona both appealed to the medievalizing tendency in Italian culture of the 1820s and 1830s and had a certain 'popular' ring about it, recalling the poets described by Claude Fauriel in his Chants populaires de la Grece moderne ten years earlier, criss-crossing their native land, informing and entertaining their people, from whom they in turn gleaned new material for their song.