mediocrity

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me·di·oc·ri·ty

 (mē′dē-ŏk′rĭ-tē)
n. pl. me·di·oc·ri·ties
1. The state or quality of being mediocre.
2. Mediocre ability, achievement, or performance.
3. One that displays mediocre qualities.

me·di·oc′ri·tize′ (-tīz′) v.
me·di·oc′ri·ti·za′tion n.

mediocrity

(ˌmiːdɪˈɒkrɪtɪ; ˌmɛd-)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being mediocre
2. a mediocre person or thing

me•di•oc•ri•ty

(ˌmi diˈɒk rɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being mediocre.
2. mediocre ability or accomplishment.
3. a mediocre person.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mediocrity - ordinariness as a consequence of being average and not outstanding
ordinariness, mundaneness, mundanity - the quality of being commonplace and ordinary
2.mediocrity - a person of second-rate ability or value; "a team of aging second-raters"; "shone among the mediocrities who surrounded him"
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"

mediocrity

noun
1. insignificance, indifference, inferiority, meanness, ordinariness, unimportance, poorness She lamented the mediocrity of contemporary literature.
2. nonentity, nobody, lightweight (informal), second-rater, cipher, non-person Surrounded by mediocrities, he seemed a towering intellectual.
Quotations
"Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes genius" [Sir Arthur Conan Doyle The Valley of Fear]
Translations
وَسَطيَّه
prostřednost
middelmådighed
középszerûség
meîalmennska
priemernosť
bayağılık

mediocrity

[ˌmiːdɪˈɒkrɪtɪ] N
1. (= quality) → mediocridad f
2. (= person) → mediocre mf

mediocrity

[ˌmiːdiˈɒkrəti] nmédiocrité f

mediocrity

n
(= quality)Mittelmäßigkeit f
(= person)kleines Licht

mediocrity

[ˌmiːdɪˈɒkrɪtɪ] nmediocrità f inv

mediocre

(miːdiˈoukə) adjective
not very good or great; ordinary. a mediocre performance/effort.
ˌmediˈocrity (-ˈo-) noun
References in classic literature ?
Two of the people he had never seen before, and the others consisted of Ernest Harrowden, one of those middle-aged mediocrities so common in London clubs who have no enemies, but are thoroughly disliked by their friends; Lady Ruxton, an overdressed woman of forty-seven, with a hooked nose, who was always trying to get herself compromised, but was so peculiarly plain that to her great disappointment no one would ever believe anything against her; Mrs.
Though Napoleon, by subordinating all things and all men to his will, retarded for a time the influence of bureaucracy (that ponderous curtain hung between the service to be done and the man who orders it), it was permanently organized under the constitutional government, which was, inevitably, the friend of all mediocrities, the lover of authentic documents and accounts, and as meddlesome as an old tradeswoman.
Is it likely that five hundred mediocrities (for there are never more than a hundred great minds to do the work of any one century), is it likely that five hundred mediocrities will have the wit to rise to the level of these considerations?
If you collect a crowd of mediocrities together, sooner or later they will fall under the dominion of a stronger head.