medusa


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Related to medusa: Greek mythology

Me·dus·a

 (mĭ-do͞o′sə, -zə, -dyo͞o′-)
n. Greek Mythology
The Gorgon who was killed by Perseus.

[Middle English Meduse, from Latin Medūsa, from Greek Medousa, from feminine present participle of medein, to protect, rule over; see med- in Indo-European roots.]

me·du·sa

 (mĭ-do͞o′sə, -zə, -dyo͞o′-)
n. pl. me·du·sas or me·du·sae (-sē, -zē)
A body form of certain cnidarians such as jellyfish, consisting of a dome-shaped structure with a mouth underneath surrounded by tentacles, and in most species constituting the free-swimming sexual stage of the organism.

[Latin Medūsa, Medusa (from the Medusa's snaky locks); see Medusa.]

Medusa

(mɪˈdjuːzə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a mortal woman who was transformed by Athena into one of the three Gorgons. Her appearance was so hideous that those who looked directly at her were turned to stone. Perseus eventually slew her. See also Pegasus1
Meˈdusan, Meˈdusal adj

medusa

(mɪˈdjuːzə)
n, pl -sas or -sae (-ziː)
1. (Animals) another name for jellyfish1, jellyfish2
2. (Zoology) Also called: medusoid or medusan one of the two forms in which a coelenterate exists. It has a jelly-like umbrella-shaped body, is free swimming, and produces gametes. Compare polyp
[C18: from the likeness of its tentacles to the snaky locks of Medusa]
meˈdusan, meˈdusal adj

me•du•sa

(məˈdu sə, -zə, -ˈdyu-)

n., pl. -sas, -sae (-sē, -zē).
the free-swimming body form in the life cycle of a jellyfish or other coelenterate, usu. dome-shaped with tentacles.
[1750–60; after Medusa, alluding to the Gorgon's snaky locks]
me•du′soid, adj.

Me•du•sa

(məˈdu sə, -zə, -ˈdyu-)

n.
the only mortal of the three Gorgons: decapitated by Perseus.
[< Latin < Greek Médousa]

me·du·sa

(mĭ-do͞o′sə)
A cnidarian in its free-swimming stage. Medusas are bell-shaped, with tentacles hanging down around a central mouth. Jellyfish are medusas, while corals and sea anemones lack a medusa stage and exist only as polyps. Compare polyp.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.medusa - (Greek mythology) a woman transformed into a Gorgon by AthenaMedusa - (Greek mythology) a woman transformed into a Gorgon by Athena; she was slain by Perseus
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Gorgon - (Greek mythology) any of three winged sister monsters and the mortal Medusa who had live snakes for hair; a glance at Medusa turned the beholder to stone
2.medusa - one of two forms that coelenterates take: it is the free-swimming sexual phase in the life cycle of a coelenteratemedusa - one of two forms that coelenterates take: it is the free-swimming sexual phase in the life cycle of a coelenterate; in this phase it has a gelatinous umbrella-shaped body and tentacles
Cnidaria, Coelenterata, phylum Cnidaria, phylum Coelenterata - hydras; polyps; jellyfishes; sea anemones; corals
cnidarian, coelenterate - radially symmetrical animals having saclike bodies with only one opening and tentacles with stinging structures; they occur in polyp and medusa forms
Translations
Meduusa
Medusza
Medūza

Medusa

[mɪˈdjuːzə] nMedusa
References in classic literature ?
I thought Medusa had looked at you, and that you were turning to stone.
They ferry over this LETHEAN Sound Both to and fro, thir sorrow to augment, And wish and struggle, as they pass, to reach The tempting stream, with one small drop to loose In sweet forgetfulness all pain and woe, All in one moment, and so neer the brink; But fate withstands, and to oppose th' attempt MEDUSA with GORGONIAN terror guards The Ford, and of it self the water flies All taste of living wight, as once it fled The lip of TANTALUS.
One might have supposed the Bastille appeared before you, and that the gigantic Medusa had converted you into stone.
In one of the aristocratic mansions built by Puget in the Rue du Grand Cours opposite the Medusa fountain, a second marriage feast was being celebrated, almost at the same hour with the nuptial repast given by Dantes.
On the left arm was a shield, and in its center appeared a lifelike representation of the head of Medusa with the snaky locks.
It is only the headless body of a man, clad in a coat of mail, with a Medusa head upon the breast-plate, but we feel persuaded that such dignity and such majesty were never thrown into a form of stone before.
WHILE bathing, Antinous was seen by Minerva, who was so enamoured of his beauty that, all armed as she happened to be, she descended from Olympus to woo him; but, unluckily displaying her shield, with the head of Medusa on it, she had the unhappiness to see the beautiful mortal turn to stone from catching a glimpse of it.
ll 270-294) And again, Ceto bare to Phoreys the fair-cheeked Graiae, sisters grey from their birth: and both deathless gods and men who walk on earth call them Graiae, Pemphredo well-clad, and saffron-robed Enyo, and the Gorgons who dwell beyond glorious Ocean in the frontier land towards Night where are the clear- voiced Hesperides, Sthenno, and Euryale, and Medusa who suffered a woeful fate: she was mortal, but the two were undying and grew not old.
Almost, when he knew the blow had started and just ere the edge of steel bit the flesh and nerves it seemed that he gazed upon the serene face of the Medusa, Truth--And, simultaneous with the bite of the steel on the onrush of the dark, in a flashing instant of fancy, he saw the vision of his head turning slowly, always turning, in the devil-devil house beside the breadfruit tree.
Autumn had already shrivelled their tawny leaves, and their high branches, black and contorted, looked like horrid heads of hair, mingled with quaint reptiles such as the ancient sculptors have made on the head of Medusa.
Here, too, the bride's aunt and next relation; a widowed female of a Medusa sort, in a stoney cap, glaring petrifaction at her fellow- creatures.
Seeing this, Maggie lingered at a distance looking like a small Medusa with her snakes cropped.