medusa

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Related to medusae: pseudocoelomate, Nematocysts

Me·dus·a

 (mĭ-do͞o′sə, -zə, -dyo͞o′-)
n. Greek Mythology
The Gorgon who was killed by Perseus.

[Middle English Meduse, from Latin Medūsa, from Greek Medousa, from feminine present participle of medein, to protect, rule over; see med- in Indo-European roots.]

me·du·sa

 (mĭ-do͞o′sə, -zə, -dyo͞o′-)
n. pl. me·du·sas or me·du·sae (-sē, -zē)
A body form of certain cnidarians such as jellyfish, consisting of a dome-shaped structure with a mouth underneath surrounded by tentacles, and in most species constituting the free-swimming sexual stage of the organism.

[Latin Medūsa, Medusa (from the Medusa's snaky locks); see Medusa.]

Medusa

(mɪˈdjuːzə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a mortal woman who was transformed by Athena into one of the three Gorgons. Her appearance was so hideous that those who looked directly at her were turned to stone. Perseus eventually slew her. See also Pegasus1
Meˈdusan, Meˈdusal adj

medusa

(mɪˈdjuːzə)
n, pl -sas or -sae (-ziː)
1. (Animals) another name for jellyfish1, jellyfish2
2. (Zoology) Also called: medusoid or medusan one of the two forms in which a coelenterate exists. It has a jelly-like umbrella-shaped body, is free swimming, and produces gametes. Compare polyp
[C18: from the likeness of its tentacles to the snaky locks of Medusa]
meˈdusan, meˈdusal adj

me•du•sa

(məˈdu sə, -zə, -ˈdyu-)

n., pl. -sas, -sae (-sē, -zē).
the free-swimming body form in the life cycle of a jellyfish or other coelenterate, usu. dome-shaped with tentacles.
[1750–60; after Medusa, alluding to the Gorgon's snaky locks]
me•du′soid, adj.

Me•du•sa

(məˈdu sə, -zə, -ˈdyu-)

n.
the only mortal of the three Gorgons: decapitated by Perseus.
[< Latin < Greek Médousa]

me·du·sa

(mĭ-do͞o′sə)
A cnidarian in its free-swimming stage. Medusas are bell-shaped, with tentacles hanging down around a central mouth. Jellyfish are medusas, while corals and sea anemones lack a medusa stage and exist only as polyps. Compare polyp.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.medusa - (Greek mythology) a woman transformed into a Gorgon by AthenaMedusa - (Greek mythology) a woman transformed into a Gorgon by Athena; she was slain by Perseus
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Gorgon - (Greek mythology) any of three winged sister monsters and the mortal Medusa who had live snakes for hair; a glance at Medusa turned the beholder to stone
2.medusa - one of two forms that coelenterates take: it is the free-swimming sexual phase in the life cycle of a coelenteratemedusa - one of two forms that coelenterates take: it is the free-swimming sexual phase in the life cycle of a coelenterate; in this phase it has a gelatinous umbrella-shaped body and tentacles
Cnidaria, Coelenterata, phylum Cnidaria, phylum Coelenterata - hydras; polyps; jellyfishes; sea anemones; corals
cnidarian, coelenterate - radially symmetrical animals having saclike bodies with only one opening and tentacles with stinging structures; they occur in polyp and medusa forms
Translations
Meduusa
Medusza
Medūza

Medusa

[mɪˈdjuːzə] nMedusa
References in classic literature ?
But we were bound to walk, so we went on, whilst above our heads waved medusae whose umbrellas of opal or rose-pink, escalloped with a band of blue, sheltered us from the rays of the sun and fiery pelagiae, which, in the darkness, would have strewn our path with phosphorescent light.
The specimens were identified as the crawling medusa, Eleutheria dichotoma, which is one of a small group of hydrozoan medusae that crawls on algae rather than swimming in the plankton.
Although both Queenscliff specimens possessed more tentacles than reported for some European and NSW medusae the number is considered variable and not diagnostic of the species (see Schuchert 2006; Brinckmann-Voss, pers.
ait laevaque a parte Medusae ipse retro versus squalentia protulit ora.
The medusae are found at the edge of mangrove lagoons in between the prop roots.
In addition, during most of the daytime the medusae of C.
The sudden appearance of medusae, with an apparently "abnormal" abundance of one or a few species medusa blooms), is a common but as yet enigmatic characteristic of gelatinous plankton life histories.
The long, narrow, and disconnected swaths of the Medusae Fossae formation extend about 5,400 kilometers along Mars' equator, about a quarter of the way around the planet.
This report documents ecological observations of this population and limnological conditions in Kaiser Pond from 6 July to 12 November 2001 when medusae were present.
The relevance of these two propulsive modes extends beyond merely swimming behavior because swimming modes relate directly to morphological and foraging characteristics of medusae (Colin and Costello, 2002; Colin et al.
The medusae disappeared when the temperature decreased to 21[degrees]C even though the zooplankton food supply was still abundant.
In Chesapeake Bay, medusae of the scyphozoan Chrysaora quinquecirrha are unusual in tolerating salinities as low as 5 [per thousands]; the scyphistomae (polyps) are not found where salinities are less than 7 [per thousands] and thrive at 10 [per thousands] to 25 [per thousands] (Cargo and Schultz, 1966, 1967).