melanoma

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Related to melanomas: malignant melanoma, skin cancer

mel·a·no·ma

 (mĕl′ə-nō′mə)
n. pl. mel·a·no·mas or mel·a·no·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A dark-pigmented, usually malignant tumor arising from a melanocyte and occurring most commonly in the skin.

melanoma

(ˌmɛləˈnəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
(Pathology) pathol a malignant tumour composed of melanocytes, occurring esp in the skin, often as a result of excessive exposure to sunlight

mel•a•no•ma

(ˌmɛl əˈnoʊ mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
any of several types of skin tumors characterized by the malignant growth of melanocytes.
[1825–35]

mel·a·no·ma

(mĕl′ə-nō′mə)
A type of skin cancer that arises from the cells that produce melanin, usually appearing as a dark-colored spot or mole.

melanoma

any malignant growth, especially in the skin, that is composed of melanin-producing cells.
See also: Cancer
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melanoma - any of several malignant neoplasms (usually of the skin) consisting of melanocytesmelanoma - any of several malignant neoplasms (usually of the skin) consisting of melanocytes
skin cancer - a malignant neoplasm of the skin
Translations
melanom
melanoom
melanooma
melanome
melanoma
メラノーマ
melanoma
melanoom
melanom

melanoma

[ˌmeləˈnəʊmə] N (melanomas or melanomata (pl)) [ˌmeləˈnəʊmətə]melanoma m

melanoma

[ˌmɛləˈnəʊmə] nmélanome m

melanoma

n (Med) → Melanom nt

mel·a·no·ma

n. melanoma, tumor maligno compuesto de melanocitos.

melanoma

n melanoma m
References in periodicals archive ?
In one study, 40% of excised melanomas had worse pathology, compared with initial punch biopsy, and 20% of melanomas revealed invasion, which was not seen in initial punch biopsy (Arch.
In the darkly pigmented black people of South Africa, 80% of melanomas occur on the sole of the foot.
Clinical examination did not reveal any cutaneous melanomas or palpable cervical lymph nodes.
7 mm in diameter) that, when removed after a period of observation, were found to be melanomas.
Although most of the melanomas previously described occur predominantly in white people, this type of melanoma occurs in approximately the same low frequency among whites and people of color.
Melanomas are cancers of the cells that produce melanin, the pigment that colors our hair, skin, and eyes.
If malignant melanomas are caught early enough, patients have an almost 100 percent cure rate.
Multiple primary melanomas do not necessarily imply a poorer prognosis, according to a clinical study.
While the majority of melanomas occur on the skin, they can develop in other areas of the body where melanocytes exist, such as the mouth.
SAN DIEGO -- The chances of a patient's developing multiple primary melanomas over a lifetime is a real phenomenon, with an incidence ranging from 2% to 8% among patients who have had a first melanoma, or an average of about 5%.
He claimed that the main reason for the supposed increase in incidence of melanoma was that many lesions, previously regarded as benign, were being classified as malignant, and that melanomas were being invented not found.
Melanomas are primarily tumours arising from the melanocytes in the skin.