melisma

(redirected from melismata)

me·lis·ma

 (mə-lĭz′mə)
n. pl. me·lis·ma·ta (-mə-tə) or me·lis·mas
A passage of multiple notes sung to one syllable of text, as in Gregorian chant.

[Greek, melody, from melizein, to sing, from melos, song.]

mel′is·mat′ic (mĕl′ĭz-măt′ĭk) adj.

melisma

(mɪˈlɪzmə)
n, pl -mata (-mətə) or -mas
(Music, other) music an expressive vocal phrase or passage consisting of several notes sung to one syllable
[C19: from Greek: melody]
melismatic adj

me•lis•ma

(mɪˈlɪz mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
a musical phrase of several notes sung to one syllable, as in plainsong.
[1605–15; < Greek mélisma song. See melody, -ism]
mel•is•mat•ic (ˌmɛl ɪzˈmæt ɪk) adj.
Translations
Melisma
References in periodicals archive ?
I do hear the humor of the opening lute accompaniment with its awkward second-inversion dominant seventh chord; I do hear the oddity of the fermata on the third syllable of "erscheinen" (we might have expected it on the second) and other strangely accented syllables, although such incorrect accentuation is precisely the reason for Sachs' hammer-enforced complaints (which arrive one eighth note after each wrongly accented syllable); I do hear the oddly extended melismata, although these would seem to be central to Meistergesang itself, as Kolhner very clearly explains it in act 1, scene 3; and I do hear those curiously falling 4ths in the melisma (in m.
It's like listening to an operatic aria in which the singer's trills, grace notes, and melismata emphasize the abstract sonic substrate rather than the meaning of what's being sung--possibly serving as mere ornamentation, but in some cases allowing for a kind of intuitive translation of the song's sense into a more abstract register.
Jesu, meine Freude and Komm, Jesu, komm, with their instances of dramatic word-painting, in particular benefited from the expressive potential of Skidmore's chamber-music approach; and even the bouncy rhythms and heady melismata of Lobet den Herrn and Singet dem Herrn had an intimacy that larger forces would have found difficult to achieve.
13/4 into the Decani Bass part where it differs from the reconstruction provided, and may also perhaps make alterations to the other voice parts by analogy: Magnificat: 57/1 `arm'; 57/2 cr rest; 60 delete text, sb for min mini 6312-64/2 `hearts of their'; 125 and 128 `end world without' (although the melismata may be preferable); Nunc Dimittis: 20/1-21/2 delete text, substitute `thy'; 20/2-3 min (with similar alteration to text of other parts?
Duos to sextets were challenged with tricky melismata - groups of notes sung to a single syllable - featured throughout, clear and brilliantly verbalised.
This we can appreciate by perceiving their dirgelike tempo and melismata resembling the subdued local production and slow, downward turning movements of someone in mourning.
The rapid melismata of Sigismondo d'India offered a welcome dash of virtuosity (the sole Monteverdi offering was a miserable opener) and even Kirkby herself described Barbara Strozzi's wonderfully dramatic Udite amanti as 'another long moan.
We also had the meltingly poignant and beautifully drawn Ave verum of Lassus against Buxtehude's Magnificat, rhythmically fluid with a fine quintet of soloists who threw off the vocal melismata with joyous alacrity.
One can understand the need they obviously felt for a new edition of this work; in that currently available in Early English Church Music, xxx, additional underlay in italics is liberally inserted into melismata without manuscript authority, and the editorial stance adopted with respect to musica ficta is that of a conscientious objector.
One can understand the need they obviously felt for a new edition of this work; in that currently availabe in Early English Church Music, xxx, additional underlay in italics is liberally inserted into melismata without manuscript authority, and the editorial stance adopted with respect to musica ficta is that of a consciountious objector.