melodramatic


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mel·o·dra·mat·ic

 (mĕl′ə-drə-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Having the excitement and emotional appeal of melodrama: "a melodramatic account of two perilous days spent among the planters" (Frank O. Gatell).
2. Exaggeratedly emotional or sentimental; histrionic: "Accuse me, if you will, of melodramatic embroidery" (Erskine Childers).
3. Characterized by false pathos and sentiment.

mel′o·dra·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

mel•o•dra•mat•ic

(ˌmɛl ə drəˈmæt ɪk)

adj.
1. of, like, or befitting melodrama.
2. exaggeratedly emotional or sentimental; disproportionately intense.
n.
3. melodramatics, melodramatic writing or behavior.
[1810–20]
mel`o•dra•mat′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.melodramatic - having the excitement and emotional appeal of melodramamelodramatic - having the excitement and emotional appeal of melodrama; "a melodramatic account of two perilous days at sea"
dramatic - suitable to or characteristic of drama; "a dramatic entrance in a swirling cape"; "a dramatic rescue at sea"
2.melodramatic - characteristic of acting or a stage performancemelodramatic - characteristic of acting or a stage performance; often affected; "histrionic gestures"; "an attitude of melodramatic despair"; "a theatrical pose"
theatrical - suited to or characteristic of the stage or theater; "a theatrical pose"; "one of the most theatrical figures in public life"

melodramatic

adjective theatrical, actorly, extravagant, histrionic, sensational, hammy (informal), actressy, stagy, overemotional, overdramatic She flung herself in a pose of melodramatic exhaustion.

melodramatic

adjective
Suggesting drama or a stage performance, as in emotionality or suspense:
Translations
مَسْرَحي عاطِفي
melodramatický
melodramatisk
melodrámai
melódramatískur, ÿktur
melodramatický

melodramatic

[ˌmeləʊdrəˈmætɪk] ADJmelodramático

melodramatic

[ˌmɛlədrəˈmætɪk] adjmélodramatique

melodramatic

adj, melodramatically

melodramatic

[ˌmɛləʊdrəˈmætɪk] adjmelodrammatico/a

melodrama

(ˈmelədraːmə) noun
1. a (type of) play in which emotions and the goodness or wickedness of the characters are exaggerated greatly.
2. (an example of) behaviour similar to a play of this sort. He makes a melodrama out of everything that happens.
ˌmelodraˈmatic (-drəˈmӕ-) adjective
ˌmelodraˈmatically adverb
References in classic literature ?
and away went Jo, with a melodramatic scream which was truly thrilling.
As I once more shouldered my pack and went my way, the character of the country side began to change, and, from a semi- pastoral heathiness and furziness, took on a wildness of aspect, which if indeed melodramatic was melodrama carried to the point of genius.
The exaggerated folly of the threat, the passionate gesture that accompanied it, the mad melodramatic words, made life seem more vivid to her.
Imposing silence, Grimaud put out the little night lamp, then knelt down and poured into the lieutenant's ear a recital melodramatic enough not to require play of feature to give it pith.
His evenings were spent at home with his books, his pictures, and his family, and usually with them alone; for, in spite of the melodramatic declarations of various English gentlemen, Melville's seclusion in his latter years, and in fact throughout his life, was a matter of personal choice.
After all," he thought, "perhaps the poison isn't hers; perhaps it's one of Muscari's melodramatic tricks.
It was deeply distasteful to him to do anything melodramatic and conspicuous, anything Mr.
It puts melodramatic nonsense into the pilgrims' heads.
He had even had a mad, melodramatic idea to drug her.
77] The portraits of actors and other theatrical celebrities range from Elizabeth, from the melodramatic costumes and faces of the contemporaries of Shakespeare, to the conventional costumes, the rotund expression, of the age of the Georges, masking a power of imaginative impersonation probably unknown in Shakespeare's day.
They reminded Tarzan of melodramatic villains he had seen at the theaters in Paris.
These two would meet, there would be recriminations, a tragic appeal for forgiveness, possibly some melodramatic attempt at vengeance.