melody


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mel·o·dy

 (mĕl′ə-dē)
n. pl. mel·o·dies
1. A pleasing succession or arrangement of sounds.
2. Musical quality: the melody of verse.
3. Music
a. A rhythmically organized sequence of single tones so related to one another as to make up a particular phrase or idea.
b. Structure with respect to the arrangement of single notes in succession.
c. The leading part or the air in a composition with accompaniment.
4. A poem suitable for setting to music or singing.

[Middle English melodie, from Old French, from Late Latin melōdia, from Greek melōidiā, singing, choral song : melos, tune + aoidē, song; see wed- in Indo-European roots.]

melody

(ˈmɛlədɪ)
n, pl -dies
1. (Music, other) music
a. a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence; tune
b. the horizontally represented aspect of the structure of a piece of music. Compare harmony4b
2. sounds that are pleasant because of tone or arrangement, esp words of poetry
[C13: from Old French, from Late Latin melōdia, from Greek melōidia singing, from melos song + -ōidia, from aoidein to sing]

mel•o•dy

(ˈmɛl ə di)

n., pl. -dies.
1. musical sounds in agreeable succession or arrangement.
2. a rhythmical succession of musical tones organized as a distinct phrase or sequence of phrases.
[1250–1300; Middle English melodie < Medieval Latin melōdia < Greek melōidía (choral) singing =mel- (see melic) + -ōid- (see ode) + -ia -y3]
mel′o•dy•less, adj.

melody

  • grace note - An extra note for embellishment, not necessary for the harmony or melody.
  • absolute music, abstract music, pure music - Absolute music (abstract music, pure music) is music for its own sake—concerned only with structure, melody, harmony, and rhythm.
  • air - An expressive succession of musical sounds—a melody or tune.
  • melody - From Greek melos, "song," its early sense was "sweet music."

Melody

 of harpers: harpists collectivelyBk. of St. Albans, 1486.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melody - a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequencemelody - a succession of notes forming a distinctive sequence; "she was humming an air from Beethoven"
tucket, fanfare, flourish - (music) a short lively tune played on brass instruments; "he entered to a flourish of trumpets"; "her arrival was greeted with a rousing fanfare"
glissando - a rapid series of ascending or descending notes on the musical scale
roulade - (music) an elaborate run of several notes sung to one syllable
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
leitmotif, leitmotiv - a melodic phrase that accompanies the reappearance of a person or situation (as in Wagner's operas)
theme song - a melody that recurs and comes to represent a musical play or movie
signature tune, theme song, signature - a melody used to identify a performer or a dance band or radio/tv program
melodic theme, musical theme, theme, idea - (music) melodic subject of a musical composition; "the theme is announced in the first measures"; "the accompanist picked up the idea and elaborated it"
part, voice - the melody carried by a particular voice or instrument in polyphonic music; "he tried to sing the tenor part"
musical phrase, phrase - a short musical passage
2.melody - the perception of pleasant arrangements of musical notesmelody - the perception of pleasant arrangements of musical notes
musical perception - the auditory perception of musical sounds

melody

noun
1. tune, song, theme, refrain, air, music, strain, descant, MLOD (S.M.S.) an easy melody with a frenetic beat
2. tunefulness, music, harmony, musicality, euphony, melodiousness, MLOD (S.M.S.) Her voice was full of melody.

melody

noun
A pleasing succession of musical tones forming a usually brief aesthetic unit:
Obsolete: note.
Translations
اللحْن الرَّئيسيلـَحْنٌنَغَم
мелодия
melodie
melodihovedstemme
melodio
melodiasävel
melodija
melódiadallam
laglaglína
メロディー旋律歌曲調べ
멜로디
melodia
melodingaimelodingasmelodingumas
melodijamelodija, tēma
melodija
melodijaмелодија
melodi
เสียงดนตรี
giai điệu

melody

[ˈmelədɪ] Nmelodía f

melody

[ˈmɛlədi] n (= tune) → mélodie f

melody

nMelodie f; (fig: of poetry etc) → Melodik f

melody

[ˈmɛlədɪ] nmelodia

melody

(ˈmelədi) plural ˈmelodies noun
1. a tune. He played Irish melodies on the harp.
2. the principal part in a piece of harmonized music. The sopranos sang the melody, and the other voices added the harmony.
meˈlodic (-ˈlo-) adjective
of melody. a melodic style.
meˈlodious (ˈlou-) adjective
pleasing to the ear; tuneful. melodious tunes.
meˈlodiously adverb
meˈlodiousness noun

melody

لـَحْنٌ melodie melodi Melodie μελωδία melodía melodia mélodie melodija melodia メロディー 멜로디 melodie melodi melodia melodia мелодия melodi เสียงดนตรี melodi giai điệu 旋律
References in classic literature ?
Hagar, in a fine dramatic melody, promised both, and proceeded to call up the spirit who would bring the love philter.
But four parts are altogether necessary to the perfection of melody.
Lying thus, wide awake, she fell into a dreamy reminiscence of the past, hearing snatches of old melody in the moving pines, fragments of sentences, old words, and familiar epithets in the murmuring wind at her ear, and even the faint breath of long-forgotten kisses on her cheek.
Human finger was hardly known to have touched its chords since the days of Alice Pyncheon, who had learned the sweet accomplishment of melody in Europe.
His only resource on such occasions, either to drown thought or drive away evil spirits, was to sing psalm tunes and the good people of Sleepy Hollow, as they sat by their doors of an evening, were often filled with awe at hearing his nasal melody, "in linked sweetness long drawn out," floating from the distant hill, or along the dusky road.
But then he made out a melody in the ringing; there were chimes.
The black, glassy eyes glittered with a kind of wicked drollery, and the thing struck up, in a clear shrill voice, an odd negro melody, to which she kept time with her hands and feet, spinning round, clapping her hands, knocking her knees together, in a wild, fantastic sort of time, and producing in her throat all those odd guttural sounds which distinguish the native music of her race; and finally, turning a summerset or two, and giving a prolonged closing note, as odd and unearthly as that of a steam-whistle, she came suddenly down on the carpet, and stood with her hands folded, and a most sanctimonious expression of meekness and solemnity over her face, only broken by the cunning glances which she shot askance from the corners of her eyes.
At length, out of the silence a noble Latin chant -- men's voices -- broke and swelled up and rolled away into the night, a majestic tide of melody.
With golden comb so lustrous, And thereby a song sings, It has a tone so wondrous, That powerful melody rings.
But now, though her voice was still sweet, I found in its melody an indescribable sadness.
The heat was tempered by a light western breeze; the voices of laborers at work in a field near reached the house cheerfully; the clock-bell of the village church as it struck the quarters floated down the wind with a clearer ring, a louder melody than usual.
Aaron was not indisposed to display his talents, even to an ogre, under protecting circumstances; and after a few more signs of coyness, consisting chiefly in rubbing the backs of his hands over his eyes, and then peeping between them at Master Marner, to see if he looked anxious for the "carril", he at length allowed his head to be duly adjusted, and standing behind the table, which let him appear above it only as far as his broad frill, so that he looked like a cherubic head untroubled with a body, he began with a clear chirp, and in a melody that had the rhythm of an industrious hammer