memsahib


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mem·sa·hib

 (mĕm′sä′hĭb, -sä′ĭb, -säb)
n.
1. Used as a form of address for a European woman in South Asia.
2. A European woman in colonial India.
3. A female mountaineer employing Sherpas or porters in the Himalayas.

memsahib

(ˈmɛmˌsɑːɪb; -hɪb)
n
(formerly in India) a term of respect used of a European married woman
[C19: from ma'am + sahib]

mem•sa•hib

(ˈmɛmˌsɑ ɪb, -ib)

n.
(formerly, in India) a term of respect for a married European woman.
[1855–60; < Hindi =mem (< E ma ' am) + sāhib master (< Arabic ṣāḥib)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.memsahib - a woman sahibmemsahib - a woman sahib        
sahib - formerly a term of respect for important white Europeans in colonial India; used after the name
Translations

memsahib

[ˈmemˌsɑːhɪb] N (India) → mujer f casada
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
In those days I rode seventy miles with an English Memsahib and her babe on my saddle-bow.
Oh, another blog post by a memsahib, a ' trailing wife'
Forget about greed memsahib, I think Master Twist was just asking for what was due a child his age," the Andaman Indian child replied.
The male empire under the female gaze; the British Raj and the memsahib.
Tiger O'Toole 7g King's Theatre - Memsahib Ofesteem Ms S Howell 3P-1522 RPR 137c OR 131c Another smashing horse who won a Grade 2 hurdle at Ascot.
All our love From All the Family xxx RIORDAN Marilyn Dawn (nee Randall) Three years since your passing, I miss you each waking hour, you were my loving wife but will always remain the Memsahib.
The notion of a lower caste Indian boy being patronised by the memsahib Miss Havisham gives Gupta the opportunity for some crude and, you might have thought, rather redundant anti-colonial gestures.
Part 2 includes an introduction (285-88), Begum Barve (289-358), Mickey and the Memsahib (359-408).
In addition, favouring after over before discourages direct confrontations of colonialism in contemporaneous records, such as the novels and stories about British women in colonial India by Canadian author and journalist Sara Jeannette Duncan, including The Simple Adventures of a Memsahib (1893), The Path of a Star (1899), The Pool in the Desert (1903), Set in Authority (1906), The Burnt Offering (1909), and The Consort (1912).
Already, her future Romanian neighbours are excited about the arrival of someone who perfectly fits their idea of an eccentric British memsahib.
of 1934, one lady was sitting in a daze reduced to rubble; Memsahib,
Cars of bitter-sweet smelling leather upholstery and clubbable, self-made men who liked to call their wives memsahib.