men


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men

 (mĕn)
n.
Plural of man.
Usage Note: When man and men are used in compounds, such as fireman, firemen, salesman, and salesmen, both -man and -men are usually pronounced (mən).

men

(mɛn)
n
the plural of man

men

(mɛn)

n.
pl. of man.

men-

var. of meno- before a vowel: menarche.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.men - the force of workers availablemen - the force of workers available  
personnel, force - group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
full complement, complement - number needed to make up a whole force; "a full complement of workers"
shift - a crew of workers who work for a specific period of time
work party, crew, gang - an organized group of workmen
Translations
ljudjemoški

men

pl de man
References in classic literature ?
Nobody spoke for a minute; then Meg said in an altered tone, "You know the reason Mother proposed not having any presents this Christmas was because it is going to be a hard winter for everyone; and she thinks we ought not to spend money for pleasure, when our men are suffering so in the army.
For a time the two men talked of the raising of the bed and then they talked of other things.
The two were inventors and proverbially poor business men, though they had amassed a fortune.
At this instant there came into court two old men, one carrying a cane by way of a walking-stick, and the one who had no stick said, "Senor, some time ago I lent this good man ten gold-crowns in gold to gratify him and do him a service, on the condition that he was to return them to me whenever I should ask for them.
There were three other men besides,--three strange brutish-looking fellows, at whom the staghounds were snarling savagely.
You, for instance, want to cure men of their old habits and reform their will in accordance with science and good sense.
Two men lay prone upon the ground, one bathed in blood and motionless, with his face toward the earth; this one was dead.
As for little Alice, she sat in Grandfather's lap, and seemed to see the very men alive whose faces were there represented.
Neither did Ernest know that the thoughts and affections which came to him so naturally, in the fields and at the fireside, and wherever he communed with himself, were of a higher tone than those which all men shared with him.
Certainly the ablest men that ever were, have had all an openness, and frankness, of dealing; and a name of certainty and veracity; but then they were like horses well managed; for they could tell passing well, when to stop or turn; and at such times, when they thought the case indeed required dissimulation, if then they used it, it came to pass that the former opinion, spread abroad, of their good faith and clearness of dealing, made them almost invisible.
The men dislike him, the women despise him, and he dislikes and despises himself.
But there is a government of another sort, in which men govern those who are their equals in rank, and freemen, which we call a political government, in which men learn to command by first submitting to obey, as a good general of horse, or a commander-in-chief, must acquire a knowledge of their duty by having been long under the command of another, and the like in every appointment in the army: for well is it said, no one knows how to command who has not himself been under command of another.