menagerie


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me·nag·er·ie

 (mə-năj′ə-rē, -năzh′-)
n.
1.
a. A collection of live wild animals on exhibition.
b. The place where such animals are kept.
2. A diverse or miscellaneous group.

[French ménagerie, from Old French mesnage, ménage; see ménage.]

menagerie

(mɪˈnædʒərɪ)
n
1. (Zoology) a collection of wild animals kept for exhibition
2. (Zoology) the place where such animals are housed
[C18: from French: household management, which formerly included care of domestic animals. See ménage]

me•nag•er•ie

(məˈnædʒ ə ri, -ˈnæʒ-)

n.
1. a collection of wild or unusual animals, esp. for exhibition.
2. a place where they are kept or exhibited.
3. an unusual and varied group of people.
[1705–15; < French: literally, housekeeping. See ménage, -ery]

Menagerie

 a collection of wild or foreign animals; an aviary, 1712.
Examples: menageries of live peers in Parliament, 1850; of pheasants, 1830.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.menagerie - a collection of live animals for study or display
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
2.menagerie - the facility where wild animals are housed for exhibitionmenagerie - the facility where wild animals are housed for exhibition
facility, installation - a building or place that provides a particular service or is used for a particular industry; "the assembly plant is an enormous facility"
Translations
مَجْموعَة حيوانات نادِرَه
zvěřinec
menageri
állatsereglet
dÿragarîur
žvėrynas
zvērnīca
zverinec
hayvanat bahçesivahşi hayvanlar koleksiyonu

menagerie

[mɪˈnædʒərɪ] Ncasa f or colección f de fieras

menagerie

[məˈnædʒəri] nménagerie f

menagerie

nMenagerie f

menagerie

[mɪˈnædʒərɪ] nserraglio

menagerie

(miˈnӕdʒəri) noun
(a place for keeping) a collection of wild animals.
References in classic literature ?
The air was filled with the fragrance of flowers and wild animals; the living portion of the menagerie of the "Naturalist Tavern" was all about us.
I think there is nothing more pathetic than to see one of these poor old childless couples taking a menagerie of yelping little worthless dogs to their hearts; and then adding some cursing and squawking parrots and a jackass-voiced macaw; and next a couple of hundred screeching songbirds, and presently some fetid guinea pigs and rabbits, and a howling colony of cats.
Smaller boys than himself flocked at his heels, as proud to be seen with him, and tolerated by him, as if he had been the drummer at the head of a procession or the elephant leading a menagerie into town.
Roach, if you find yourself in the middle of a menagerie and Martha Sowerby's Dickon more at home than you or me could ever be.
Exceedingly red-eyed and grim, as if he had been up all night at a party which had taken anything but a convivial turn, Jerry Cruncher worried his breakfast rather than ate it, growling over it like any four-footed inmate of a menagerie.
The brisk fire of questioning to which he was exposed, elicited from him that he was thinking of an animal, a live animal, rather a disagreeable animal, a savage animal, an animal that growled and grunted sometimes, and talked sometimes, and lived in London, and walked about the streets, and wasn't made a show of, and wasn't led by anybody, and didn't live in a menagerie, and was never killed in a market, and was not a horse, or an ass, or a cow, or a bull, or a tiger, or a dog, or a pig, or a cat, or a bear.
Like a lion in a menagerie, it is a survival of the extinct chaos entrapped and exhibited amid the smug parks and well-rolled downs of England.
That was how the Sunday SUN put it, and a clever and remarkably prompt "handbook" article in the REFEREE compared the affair to a menagerie suddenly let loose in a village.
Some of the households were lively, some mournful; some were stopping at the doors of wayside inns; where, in due time, the Durbeyfield menagerie also drew up to bait horses and refresh the travellers.
They were born too late to see Noah's ark, and died too soon to see our menagerie.
It was a whole menagerie of rare and curious beasts in a wondrous hot-house, where numberless birds with plumage of a thousand hues gleamed and fluttered in the sunshine.
She ate noisily, greedily, a little like a wild beast in a menagerie, and after she had finished each course rubbed the plate with pieces of bread till it was white and shining, as if she did not wish to lose a single drop of gravy.