mendicant


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Related to mendicant: Mendicant orders

men·di·cant

 (mĕn′dĭ-kənt)
adj.
1. Depending on alms for a living; practicing begging.
2. Of or relating to religious orders whose members are forbidden to own property individually or in common and must work or beg for their livings.
n.
1. A beggar.
2. A member of a mendicant order.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin mendīcāns, mendīcant-, present participle of mendīcāre, to beg, from mendīcus, needy, beggar, from mendum, physical defect.]

men′di·can·cy, men·dic′i·ty (-dĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

mendicant

(ˈmɛndɪkənt)
adj
1. begging
2. (Roman Catholic Church) (of a member of a religious order) dependent on alms for sustenance: mendicant friars.
3. characteristic of a beggar
n
4. (Roman Catholic Church) a mendicant friar
5. a less common word for beggar
[C16: from Latin mendīcāre to beg, from mendīcus beggar, from mendus flaw]
ˈmendicancy, mendicity n

men•di•cant

(ˈmɛn dɪ kənt)

adj.
1. begging; living on alms.
2. pertaining to or characteristic of a beggar.
3. of or pertaining to various religious orders, as the Dominicans or the Franciscans, that combine the monastic life with an active ministry in teaching or preaching and that originally owned neither personal nor community property, living chiefly on alms.
n.
4. a person who lives by begging; beggar.
5. a mendicant friar.
[1425–75; < Latin mendīcant-, s. of mendīcāns, present participle of mendīcāre to beg, derivative of mendīcus beggarly; see -ant]
men′di•can•cy, men•dic′i•ty (-ˈdɪs ɪ ti) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mendicant - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on almsmendicant - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on alms
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
Carmelite, White Friar - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the white cloak of the Carmelite order; mendicant preachers
Black Friar, Blackfriar, Dominican, friar preacher - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the black mantle of the Dominican order
Franciscan, Grey Friar - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the grey habit of the Franciscan order
Augustinian - a Roman Catholic friar or monk belonging to one of the Augustinian monastic orders
2.mendicant - a pauper who lives by beggingmendicant - a pauper who lives by begging  
beggarman - a man who is a beggar
beggarwoman - a woman who is a beggar
cadger, mooch, moocher, scrounger - someone who mooches or cadges (tries to get something free)
panhandler - a beggar who approaches strangers asking for money
pauper - a person who is very poor
sannyasi, sannyasin, sanyasi - a Hindu religious mendicant
Adj.1.mendicant - practicing beggary; "mendicant friars"

mendicant

adjective
1. begging, sponging (informal), scrounging (informal), mooching (informal), cadging mendicant religious orders
noun
1. beggar, tramp, vagrant, bum (U.S. informal), pauper, hobo (U.S.), scrounger (informal), vagabond, sponger (informal) He had no fear that he would ever become a mendicant.

mendicant

noun
One who begs habitually or for a living:
Informal: panhandler.
Slang: bummer, moocher.
Translations
kerjäläinenkerjäläismunkki
mendicans

mendicant

[ˈmendɪkənt] (frm)
A. ADJmendicante
B. Nmendicante mf

mendicant

adjbettelnd; mendicant monkBettelmönch m; mendicant orderBettelorden nt
n (= beggar)Bettler(in) m(f); (= monk)Bettelmönch m
References in classic literature ?
With this lamentable story , and with the humblest apologies for presuming on a slight acquaintance, the Marrables appeared at Combe-Raven, to appeal to the young ladies for a "Lucy," and to the universe for a "Falkland," with the mendicant pertinacity of a family in despair.
I will pay it with the help of my brethren; for I must beg as a mendicant at the door of our synagogue ere I make up so unheard-of a sum.
For this reason the Iliad and the Odyssey each furnish the subject of one tragedy, or, at most, of two; while the Cypria supplies materials for many, and the Little Iliad for eight--the Award of the Arms, the Philoctetes, the Neoptolemus, the Eurypylus, the Mendicant Odysseus, the Laconian Women, the Fall of Ilium, the Departure of the Fleet.
In the meantime they were advancing toward the square, and the moment the coadjutor and the curate put their feet on the first church step the mendicant arose and proffered his brush.
Medbourne, in the vigor of his age, had been a prosperous merchant, but had lost his all by a frantic speculation, and was now little better than a mendicant.
In a few minutes the Curator saw that his guest was no mere bead- telling mendicant, but a scholar of parts.
He was a Sunnyasi--a houseless, wandering mendicant, depending on his neighbours for his daily bread; and so long as there is a morsel to divide in India, neither priest nor beggar starves.
Among my headings under this one twelve months I find an account of the adventure of the Paradol Chamber, of the Amateur Mendicant Society, who held a luxurious club in the lower vault of a furniture warehouse, of the facts connected with the loss of the British barque "Sophy Anderson", of the singular adventures of the Grice Patersons in the island of Uffa, and finally of the Camberwell poisoning case.
I have heard of many things that redound to the credit of the priesthood, but the most notable matter that occurs to me now is the devotion one of the mendicant orders showed during the prevalence of the cholera last year.
But memory is a base mendicant with basket and badge, in the presence of these sudden masters.
A tattered mendicant, who could not collect any coins, lost as he was in the midst of the crowd, and who had not probably found sufficient indemnity in the pockets of his neighbors, had hit upon the idea of perching himself upon some conspicuous point, in order to attract looks and alms.
Casaubon, too, was the centre of his own world; if he was liable to think that others were providentially made for him, and especially to consider them in the light of their fitness for the author of a "Key to all Mythologies," this trait is not quite alien to us, and, like the other mendicant hopes of mortals, claims some of our pity.