mending


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mend·ing

 (mĕn′dĭng)
n.
Clothes and other articles that must be repaired: We let the mending accumulate until Wednesday.

mending

(ˈmɛndɪŋ)
n
something to be mended, esp clothes

mend•ing

(ˈmɛn dɪŋ)

n.
articles, esp. clothes, to be mended.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mending - garments that must be repairedmending - garments that must be repaired  
garment - an article of clothing; "garments of the finest silk"
2.mending - the act of putting something in working order againmending - the act of putting something in working order again
improvement - the act of improving something; "their improvements increased the value of the property"
darning - the act of mending a hole in a garment with crossing threads
patching - the act of mending a hole in a garment by sewing a patch over it
maintenance, upkeep, care - activity involved in maintaining something in good working order; "he wrote the manual on car care"
quick fix, quickie, quicky, band aid - hurried repair
restoration - the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
reconstruction - the activity of constructing something again
restitution - the act of restoring something to its original state
Translations
أشْياء بِحاجَةٍ إلى تَصْليحإصْلاح، تَصْليح
opravavěci k správce
reparationreparationstøj
javítanivalómegjavítás
fatnaîur sem òarfnast viîgerîarviîgerî
veci na opravu
dikikonarmasöküktamir etmeyama

mending

[ˈmendɪŋ] N
1. (= act) → reparación f, arreglo m; [of clothes] → zurcido m
invisible mendingzurcido m invisible
2. (= clothes to be mended) → ropa f para remendar

mending

[ˈmɛndɪŋ] n [garments] → raccommodage m

mending

n (= articles to be mended)Flickarbeit f

mending

[ˈmɛndɪŋ] n (act) → rammendo; (items to be mended) → cose fpl da rammendare

mend

(mend) verb
1. to put (something broken, torn etc) into good condition again; to repair. Can you mend this broken chair?
2. to grow better, especially in health. My broken leg is mending very well.
noun
a repaired place. This shirt has a mend in the sleeve.
ˈmending noun
1. the act of repairing. the mending of the chair.
2. things needing to be mended, especially by sewing. Put your torn shirt with my pile of mending!
References in classic literature ?
Laurence's ear in some mysterious way, he set about mending matters.
They sat about the house most of the day as if it were Sunday; greasing their boots, mending their suspenders, plaiting whiplashes.
She told her to notice particularly if a fine linen handkerchief of Monsieur Ratignolle's, which was missing last week, had been returned; and to be sure to set to one side such pieces as required mending and darning.
All our arguing with him would not avail; let him be, I say: and Heaven have mercy on us all --Presbyterians and Pagans alike --for we are all somehow dreadfully cracked about the head, and sadly need mending.
I will go in tomorrow, and do any cleaning there may be, and look over the mending," said Rachel.
She was one of those people who are infatuated with patent medicines and all new-fangled methods of producing health or mending it.
You see, they was mending her machinery, but I didn't know anything about it, not being very much used to steamboats.
said Miranda, taking off her spectacles and laying down her mending.
They find less difficulty from the want of beds, than from the want of time to sleep; for when their day's work in the field is done, the most of them having their wash- ing, mending, and cooking to do, and having few or none of the ordinary facilities for doing either of these, very many of their sleeping hours are con- sumed in preparing for the field the coming day; and when this is done, old and young, male and female, married and single, drop down side by side, on one common bed,--the cold, damp floor,--each covering himself or herself with their miserable blankets; and here they sleep till they are summoned to the field by the driver's horn.
Zillah received me, and saying "the lad was mending nicely," showed me into a small, tidy, carpeted apartment, where, to my inexpressible joy, I beheld Linton laid on a little sofa, reading one of my books.
At length she turned into a dull, dark street, where the noise and crowd were lost; and I said, 'We may speak to her now'; and, mending our pace, we went after her.
She was most noticeable, I thought, in respect of her extremities; for, her hair always wanted brushing, her hands always wanted washing, and her shoes always wanted mending and pulling up at heel.