menial


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me·ni·al

 (mē′nē-əl, mēn′yəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to work or a job regarded as servile.
2. Of, relating to, or appropriate for a servant.
n.
1. A servant, especially a domestic servant.
2. A person who has a servile or low nature.

[Middle English meinial, belonging to a household, from Anglo-Norman meignial, from meignee, household, from Vulgar Latin *mānsiōnāta, from Latin mānsiō, mānsiōn-, house; see mansion.]

me′ni·al·ly adv.

menial

(ˈmiːnɪəl)
adj
1. consisting of or occupied with work requiring little skill, esp domestic duties such as cleaning
2. of, involving, or befitting servants
3. servile
n
4. a domestic servant
5. a servile person
[C14: from Anglo-Norman meignial, from Old French meinie household. See meiny]
ˈmenially adv

me•ni•al

(ˈmi ni əl, ˈmin yəl)

adj.
1. servile; degrading: menial work.
2. of or suitable for servants; humble.
n.
3. a domestic servant.
[1350–1400; Middle English meynyal < Anglo-French me(i)nial]
me′ni•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.menial - a domestic servantmenial - a domestic servant      
servant, retainer - a person working in the service of another (especially in the household)
Adj.1.menial - used of unskilled work (especially domestic work)menial - used of unskilled work (especially domestic work)
unskilled - not having or showing or requiring special skill or proficiency; "unskilled in the art of rhetoric"; "an enthusiastic but unskillful mountain climber"; "unskilled labor"; "workers in unskilled occupations are finding fewer and fewer job opportunities"; "unskilled workmanship"

menial

noun
1. servant, domestic, attendant, lackey, labourer, serf, underling, drudge, vassal (archaic), dogsbody (informal), flunky, skivvy (chiefly Brit.), varlet (archaic) The name 'beef-eater' was aimed at any well-fed menial.
servant lord, boss, chief, master, commander, superior, baas (S. African)

menial

adjective
Excessively eager to serve or obey:
Translations

menial

[ˈmiːnɪəl]
A. ADJ (= lowly) → servil; (= domestic) → doméstico, de la casa
menial worktrabajo m de baja categoría
B. N (= servant) → sirviente/a m/f

menial

[ˈmiːniəl] adj [job, task] → subalterne

menial

adjniedrig, untergeordnet; she regards no task as too menial for hersie betrachtet keine Arbeit für unter ihrer Würde; the menial staffdie (unteren) Dienstboten, das Gesinde
n (pej)Dienstbote m/-botin f

menial

[ˈmiːnɪəl] adj (position) → subalterno/a; (work, task) → umile, servile
References in classic literature ?
Larry Donovan was a passenger conductor, one of those train-crew aristocrats who are always afraid that someone may ask them to put up a car-window, and who, if requested to perform such a menial service, silently point to the button that calls the porter.
And actually reduced to take some menial employment," added Christie, still regarding Dick with her clear glance.
If Quint--on your remonstrance at the time you speak of-- was a base menial, one of the things Miles said to you, I find myself guessing, was that you were another.
From his complete inattention to the tidings, you would think that moody Ahab had not heard his menial.
The same lady pays for the education and clothing of an orphan from the workhouse, on condition that she shall aid the mistress in such menial offices connected with her own house and the school as her occupation of teaching will prevent her having time to discharge in person.
They are dressed by men till four years of age, and then are obliged to dress themselves, although their quality be ever so great; and the women attendant, who are aged proportionably to ours at fifty, perform only the most menial offices.
Dick was put to this menial task forthwith, the Admiral not even watching how he did, but quite occupied with another grog and a pleasant vein of talk.
For if he does himself all these menial offices, surely it is proof that there is no one else in the castle, it must have been the Count himself who was the driver of the coach that brought me here.
He covered himself with wounds and bruises, dressed himself all in rags, and entered the enemy's city looking like a menial or a beggar, and quite different from what he did when he was among his own people.
Peter she called Pierre; Robert was Rubert {sic}; and her aunt's black footman Timothy, she had designated as Timotheus: but it was not usual for ladies to request gentlemen to perform menial offices--until, recollecting that Julia had expressed unusual solicitude concerning a dressing-box that contained Anna's letters, he at once supposed it was to that she wished him to attend.
Our natures had adapted themselves to circumstances, and we no longer pined for the luxuries of the linum usitatissimum, but were ready to enter into all the pleasures of our new existence; which we well understood was to be one of pure parade, for no handkerchief of our quality was ever employed on any of the more menial offices of the profession.
As to the Indian, he is a game animal, not to be degraded by useful or menial toil.