mensch

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mensch

or mensh  (mĕnsh)
n. pl. mensch·es or mensch·en (mĕn′shən) Informal
A person of integrity and honor.

[Yiddish, human being, mensch, from Middle High German, human being, from Old High German mennisco; see man- in Indo-European roots.]

mensch

(mɛnʃ)
n
informal US a good person

mensch

(mɛntʃ)

n. Informal.
a decent and responsible person.
[1950–55; < Yiddish mentsh man, human being < Middle High German mensch, Old High German mennisco, mannisco; see man, -ish1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mensch - a decent responsible person with admirable characteristicsmensch - a decent responsible person with admirable characteristics
Yiddish - a dialect of High German including some Hebrew and other words; spoken in Europe as a vernacular by many Jews; written in the Hebrew script
good person - a person who is good to other people
References in periodicals archive ?
For the Menshes, all interpretation of Jim's behavior must be understood primarily in reference to white models of the "good nigger," in contrast to whites' views of rebellious slaves or postwar freemen arrogantly claiming their rights.
Neither the Menshes nor Chadwick-Joshua make such broad claims about literary interpretation as I have made here, but I believe one of the reasons why they come to such opposite conclusions studying the same evidence is that they are using entirely different models for what literature is and how to interpret it--models that I have tried to foreground here.
As the Menshes indicate, critics and teachers claimed required reading of the novel in the nation's classrooms in the 1950s; they thought of Huck Finn as America's boy, Jim as a kindly, loyal, and noble character, and the relation of Huck and Jim as the ideal reconciliation between black and white.
What the Menshes ask throughout the book is whether Huckleberry Finn subverts or upholds "customary beliefs" regarding race.
The Menshes examine representations of blacks and whites and the relations between them in the novel and connect these fictional representations to nineteenth- and twentieth-century racial attitudes.
THE exact opposite of schnorrer is mensh, meaning a man of honour, a real gent - and when it comes to menshes I always think of Jimmy Savile.