mental cruelty


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mental cruelty

n
(Law) behaviour that causes distress to another person but that does not involve physical assault
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Five black teenagers from Gothenburg decide to inflict mental cruelty on three white and Asian kids (Sebastian Blyckert, Sebastian Hegmar, John Ortiz) with the aim of stealing the boys' phones and money.
Until the current article is wiped out, many authors, cartoonists and academics will suffer a mental cruelty for they are targeted through the law," Oran noted.
Coleen says SHE'S clearly in an abusive marriage and the mental cruelty has now tipped over into physical abuse.
Secretly, I think both north and south would be satisfied at that -- refugees on both sides having suffered forty years of iniquitous mental cruelty at the hands of our meretricious politicians, whose inventories are unlimited.
He added: "Although in many respects and in dif-difficult circumstances your mother did her best for you and you for her it was clear that over a period of years you suffered longterm mental cruelty at her hands.
The man, Ariel Castro, turned out to be a sadistic torturer who imprisoned her in his filthy house for nearly 11 years, subjecting her to unimaginable physical, sexual and mental cruelty.
Reasons for divorce like infidelity, physical and mental cruelty, habitual use of alcohol and drugs and marriages sealed in haste account for less than 1.
He said it's almost like mental cruelty because he expected to find out the verdict at the end of the hearing on Tuesday, yet he was told they will email his lawyer on August 10.
He had some refinement of thought, some clear calculation too, but also some inconsistency, flashes of temper, volatility and perhaps some mental cruelty.
This diminutive pink lady seems an unlikely villain until she reveals a steely resolve to abolish any dissenting point of view, even (and especially, given the gleam in her eyes) if that involves physical torture and mental cruelty.
Seventeen years later, in 1985, the Parliament of Canada amended the Divorce Act further, adding the grounds of physical and mental cruelty, as well as "no-fault.
This breakdown can be proven in three ways: the husband and wife has lived apart for at least one year; one of the parties has committed adultery; or that one of the spouses has treated the other with physical or mental cruelty.