mental lexicon


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mental lexicon

n
(Psychology) the store of words in a person's mind
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mental lexicon - a language user's knowledge of wordsmental lexicon - a language user's knowledge of words
cognition, knowledge, noesis - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
language, speech - the mental faculty or power of vocal communication; "language sets homo sapiens apart from all other animals"
References in periodicals archive ?
We should delete from our mental lexicon words that bespeak of selfish desires, obsessions, cancellation of others or inciting of sectarian hatred.
These findings suggested that seeing someone speak activates speech processes that link "seen" words to "actual" words in the mental lexicon, and the activation is particularly strong when you see yourself speak.
This paper presents a priming experiment designed with the aim of throwing light on the representation of Polish compound words in the mental lexicon.
Theoretical approaches to the representation of morphology in the mental lexicon
The "patterns-in-the-lexicon" approach assumes that surface phonological forms are governed by patterns in the mental lexicon and by analogies to these patterns.
Eddington's model also assumes that when speakers are presented with an unfamiliar word, they access their mental lexicon and search for words that are similar to the word in question.
Eleven international academics, researchers, and independent scholars--the majority from Central Europe--contribute ten chapters on processes in the second language mental lexicon, including insights from psycholinguistics, corpus linguistics and educational linguistics.
Interest in lexis and the nature of mental lexicon leads researchers to various theoretical positions and stimulates research on learning foreign vocabulary.
The unceasing interest that researchers take in the processes of learning foreign lexis and in the nature of the L2 mental lexicon derives from the recognized fact that lexical knowledge is definitely a fundamental factor both in the development of second language competence and in all aspects of its subsequent use (cf.
Accordingly, all known diminutives are presumed to be stored in the mental lexicon as completely formed units with associative links to their base forms.
They then test their theories against Behavior Phenomenon Criterion and the Mental Lexicon and relate them to the Biology, Evolution, and Explanation Criteria.
The entire collection of articles talks about vocabulary in foreign language processing, but the question of the mental lexicon proper is discussed most thoroughly in Janusz Arabski's article "Learning strategies of L1, L2 and L3 lexis".