mentor


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to mentor: dictionary

men·tor

 (mĕn′tôr′, -tər)
n.
1. A wise and trusted counselor or teacher.
2. Mentor Greek Mythology Odysseus's trusted counselor, in whose guise Athena became the guardian and teacher of Telemachus.
v. men·tored, men·tor·ing, men·tors
v.intr.
To serve as a trusted counselor or teacher, especially in occupational settings.
v.tr.
To serve as a trusted counselor or teacher to (another person).

[French Mentor, Mentor, from Latin Mentōr, from Greek; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

mentor

(ˈmɛntɔː)
n
a wise or trusted adviser or guide
vb
to act as a mentor to (someone); train
[C18: from Mentor]
menˈtorial adj

Mentor

(ˈmɛntɔː)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) the friend whom Odysseus put in charge of his household when he left for Troy. He was the adviser of the young Telemachus

men•tor

(ˈmɛn tɔr, -tər)

n.
1. a wise and trusted counselor or teacher.
2. (cap.) (in the Odyssey) a loyal adviser of Odysseus entrusted with the education of Telemachus.
v.i.
3. to act as a mentor.
v.t.
4. to act as a mentor to.
[1740–50; « Greek]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mentor - a wise and trusted guide and advisormentor - a wise and trusted guide and advisor
intellectual, intellect - a person who uses the mind creatively
sage - a mentor in spiritual and philosophical topics who is renowned for profound wisdom
Verb1.mentor - serve as a teacher or trusted counselormentor - serve as a teacher or trusted counselor; "The famous professor mentored him during his years in graduate school"; "She is a fine lecturer but she doesn't like mentoring"
instruct, teach, learn - impart skills or knowledge to; "I taught them French"; "He instructed me in building a boat"

mentor

noun guide, teacher, coach, adviser, tutor, instructor, counsellor, guru She has sacked her coach and mentor and is now relying on her father.

mentor

noun
One who advises another, especially officially or professionally:
Law: counsel.
verb
Informal. To give recommendations to (someone) about a decision or course of action:
Translations
mentoroidaohjataopastaa
mentor

mentor

[ˈmentɔːʳ] Nmentor m

mentor

[ˈmɛntɔːr] nmentor m

mentor

nMentor(in) m(f)

mentor

[ˈmɛntɔː] nmentore m
References in classic literature ?
I wish I could run off too," said Jo, forgetting her part of mentor in lively visions of martial life at the capital.
It is not wholly irrespective of our personal feelings that we record HIM as the Mentor of our young Telemachus, for it is good to know that our town produced the founder of the latter's fortunes.
Certainly; I see you are a model Mentor," said Albert "Good-by, we shall return on Sunday.
ASSEMBLY OF THE PEOPLE OF ITHACA--SPEECHES OF TELEMACHUS AND OF THE SUITORS--TELEMACHUS MAKES HIS PREPARATIONS AND STARTS FOR PYLOS WITH MINERVA DISGUISED AS MENTOR.
Teucer son of Telamon was the first to kill his man, to wit, the warrior Imbrius, son of Mentor, rich in horses.
Though I am not your mentor, nor wish to be, at least I have a right to require that you shall not actually compromise me.
Servin, who had a sketch to finish, played the part of mentor to the two young people, who talked to each other chiefly in Corsican.
I was prepared to be persuasive, touching, and hortatory, admonitory and expostulating, if need be vituperative even, indignant and sarcastic; but what the devil does a mentor do when the sinner makes no bones about confessing his sin?
It was the old tragedy of insularity trying to serve as mentor to the universal.
In the old story, my dear sir, Mentor sometimes surprised Telemachus.
Polly had seen a good deal of him during her visits at the Shaws', where he was intimate, owing to the friendship between Madam and his mother; but she had never thought of him as a possible lover for either Fanny or herself because he was six or eight years older than they, and still sometimes assumed the part of a venerable mentor, as in the early days.
This burst of confidence confirmed Rose in her purpose of winning Charlie's Mentor back to him, but she said no more, contented to have done so well.