meridian


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Me·rid·i·an

 (mə-rĭd′ē-ən)
A city of eastern Mississippi near the Alabama border east of Jackson. A confederate base during the Civil War, it developed as a railroad junction.

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meridian

me·rid·i·an

 (mə-rĭd′ē-ən)
n.
1.
a. An imaginary great circle on the earth's surface passing through the North and South geographic poles.
b. Either half of such a great circle from pole to pole. All points on the same meridian have the same longitude.
2. Astronomy A great circle passing through the two poles of the celestial sphere and the zenith of a given observer. Also called celestial meridian, local meridian, vertical circle.
3. Mathematics
a. A curve on a surface of revolution, formed by the intersection of the surface with a plane containing the axis of revolution.
b. A plane section of a surface of revolution containing the axis of revolution.
4. Any of the longitudinal lines or pathways on the body along which the acupuncture points are distributed.
5. Archaic
a. The highest point in the sky reached by the sun or another celestial body; a zenith.
b. The time at which the sun reaches its highest point in the sky; noon.
6. The highest point or stage of development; peak: "Men come to their meridian at various periods of their lives" (John Henry Newman).
7. Midwestern US See median.
adj.
1. Of or relating to a meridian; meridional.
2. Of or at midday: the meridian hour.
3. Of, relating to, or constituting the highest point, as of development or power: the empire in its meridian period.

[Middle English, from Old French, midday, from Latin merīdiānus, of midday, from merīdiēs, midday, from merīdiē, at midday, alteration of earlier *medīdiē, from *mediei diē : *mediei, dative (locative) of medius, middle; see medhyo- in Indo-European roots + diē, dative of diēs, day; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

meridian

(məˈrɪdɪən)
n
1. (Physical Geography)
a. one of the imaginary lines joining the north and south poles at right angles to the equator, designated by degrees of longitude from 0° at Greenwich to 180°
b. the great circle running through both poles. See prime meridian
2. (Astronomy) astronomy
a. the great circle on the celestial sphere passing through the north and south celestial poles and the zenith and nadir of the observer
b. (as modifier): a meridian instrument.
3. (Mathematics) maths Also called: meridian section a section of a surface of revolution, such as a paraboloid, that contains the axis of revolution
4. the peak; zenith: the meridian of his achievements.
5. (Complementary Medicine) (in acupuncture, etc) any of the channels through which vital energy is believed to circulate round the body
6. (Historical Terms) obsolete noon
adj
7. (Physical Geography) along or relating to a meridian
8. of or happening at noon
9. relating to the peak of something
[C14: from Latin merīdiānus of midday, from merīdiēs midday, from medius mid1 + diēs day]

me•rid•i•an

(məˈrɪd i ən)

n.
1.
a. a great circle of the earth passing through the poles and any given point on the earth's surface.
b. the half of such a circle included between the poles.
2. the great circle of the celestial sphere that passes through its poles and the observer's zenith.
3. a point or period of highest development, greatest prosperity, or the like.
adj.
4. of or pertaining to a meridian.
5. of or indicating a period of greatest attainment.
6. of or pertaining to noon.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin merīdiānus of noon =merīdi(ēs) midday + -ānus -an1]

me·rid·i·an

(mə-rĭd′ē-ən)
1.
a. An imaginary line forming a great circle that passes through the North and South Poles.
b. Either half of such a circle from pole to pole. All the places on the same meridian have the same longitude. See more at equator.
2. Astronomy A great circle passing through the poles of the celestial sphere and the point on the celestial sphere that is directly above the observer.

meridian

1. a great circle that passes through the earth’s poles and any other given point on the earth’s surface.
2. half of such a circle.
3. any line of longitude running north and south on a map. See also astronomy. — meridian, meridional, adj.
See also: Geography
an imaginary great circle in the sphere of the heavens, passing through the poles and the zenith and nadir of any point and intersecting the equator at right angles. See also 178. GEOGRAPHY. — meridian, meridional, adj.
See also: Astronomy
the highest point a planet or other orbiting heavenly body reaches in its orbit. — meridian, meridional, adj.
See also: Planets

meridian

A line of longitude passing between the poles at right angles to the equator.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meridian - the highest level or degree attainablemeridian - the highest level or degree attainable; the highest stage of development; "his landscapes were deemed the acme of beauty"; "the artist's gifts are at their acme"; "at the height of her career"; "the peak of perfection"; "summer was at its peak"; "...catapulted Einstein to the pinnacle of fame"; "the summit of his ambition"; "so many highest superlatives achieved by man"; "at the top of his profession"
degree, stage, level, point - a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process; "a remarkable degree of frankness"; "at what stage are the social sciences?"
2.meridian - a town in eastern MississippiMeridian - a town in eastern Mississippi  
Magnolia State, Mississippi, MS - a state in the Deep South on the gulf of Mexico; one of the Confederate States during the American Civil War
3.meridian - an imaginary great circle on the surface of the earth passing through the north and south poles at right angles to the equatormeridian - an imaginary great circle on the surface of the earth passing through the north and south poles at right angles to the equator; "all points on the same meridian have the same longitude"
great circle - a circular line on the surface of a sphere formed by intersecting it with a plane passing through the center
observer's meridian - a meridian that passes through the observer's zenith
prime meridian - meridian at zero degree longitude from which east and west are reckoned (usually the Greenwich longitude in England)
magnetic meridian - an imaginary line passing through both magnetic poles of the Earth
Adj.1.meridian - of or happening at noonmeridian - of or happening at noon; "meridian hour"
2.meridian - being at the best stage of development; "our manhood's prime vigor"- Robert Browning
mature - having reached full natural growth or development; "a mature cell"

meridian

noun
The highest point or state:
Informal: payoff.
Medicine: fastigium.
Translations
خَط الزَّوال، خَط طول
poledník
længdegradmeridian
délkörmeridián
hádegisbaugur
meridianas
meridiāns
poludník

meridian

[məˈrɪdɪən] N
1. (Astron, Geog) → meridiano m
2. (fig) → cenit m, auge m

meridian

[məˈrɪdiən] nméridien m

meridian

n (Astron, Geog) → Meridian m; (fig)Höhepunkt m, → Gipfel m

meridian

[məˈrɪdɪən] nmeridiano

meridian

(məˈridiən) noun
an imaginary line on the earth's surface passing through the poles and any given place; any line of longitude.

me·rid·i·an

n. meridiano, línea imaginaria que conecta los extremos opuestos del axis en la superficie de un cuerpo esférico.
References in classic literature ?
Heyward watched the sun, as he darted his meridian rays through the branches of the trees, and pined for the moment when the policy of Magua should change their route to one more favorable to his hopes.
Open a passage; and I promise ye, Mistress Prynne shall be set where man, woman, and child may have a fair sight of her brave apparel from this time till an hour past meridian.
I feared my hopes were too bright to be realised; and I had enjoyed so much bliss lately that I imagined my fortune had passed its meridian, and must now decline.
Sometimes towards EDEN which now in his view Lay pleasant, his grievd look he fixes sad, Sometimes towards Heav'n and the full-blazing Sun, Which now sat high in his Meridian Towre: Then much revolving, thus in sighs began.
The 20th of July, the tropic of Capricorn was cut by 105d of longitude, and the 27th of the same month we crossed the Equator on the 110th meridian.
This famous timepiece, always regulated on the Greenwich meridian, which was now some seventy-seven degrees westward, was at least four hours slow.
The moon was now past the meridian and travelling down the west.
The sun had nearly reached the meridian, and his scorching rays fell full on the rocks, which seemed themselves sensible of the heat.
He was now in the meridian of life; his matrimonial affections, never violent, were sobered into a calm, habitual sentiment; of all husbands, he was likely to be the most constant, because a certain sluggishness would keep his heart at rest, wherever it might be placed.
Yes, Charlotte, I may now speak without injustice, or the fear of being selfish: I have long loved you-- how tenderly, how purely, none can ever know; but could I, with a certainty of my fate before my eyes, with the knowledge that my days were numbered, and that the sun of my life could never reach its meridian, woo you to my love, to make you miserable
What's the good of Mercator's North Poles and Equators, Tropics, Zones, and Meridian Lines?
Trans-Asiatic Directs we met, soberly ringing the world round the Fiftieth Meridian at an honest seventy knots; and white-painted Ackroyd & Hunt fruiters out of the south fled beneath us, their ventilated hulls whistling like Chinese kites.