merino

(redirected from merinos)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

me·ri·no

 (mə-rē′nō)
n. pl. me·ri·nos
1.
a. Any of a breed of sheep, originally from Spain, having long fine wool.
b. The wool of this sheep.
2. A soft lightweight fabric made originally of merino wool but now of any fine wool.
3.
a. A yarn made from merino wool.
b. A knitted fabric made from this yarn.

[Spanish, perhaps from Berber Benī Merīn, name of the tribe that developed the breed, or from Spanish merino, local magistrate (from Latin māiōrīnus, larger, from māior; see major).]

me·ri′no adj.

merino

(məˈriːnəʊ)
n, pl -nos
1. (Breeds) a breed of sheep, originating in Spain, bred for their fleece
2. (Textiles) the long fine wool of this sheep
3. (Textiles) the yarn made from this wool, often mixed with cotton
4. pure merino informal
a. history a free settler rather than a convict
b. an affluent and socially prominent person
c. (as modifier): a pure merino cricketer.
5. (Historical Terms) history a free settler rather than a convict
6. an affluent and socially prominent person
7. (as modifier): a pure merino cricketer.
adj
(Textiles) made from merino wool
[C18: from Spanish, origin uncertain]

me•ri•no

(məˈri noʊ)

n., pl. -nos,
adj. n.
1. (often cap.) one of a breed of sheep, raised orig. in Spain, valued for their fine wool.
2. wool from such sheep.
3. a yarn or fabric made from this wool.
adj.
4. made of merino wool, yarn, or cloth.
[1775–85; < Sp < Arabic (banū) marīn a Berber tribe known for raising this breed]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.merino - white sheep originating in Spain and producing a heavy fleece of exceptional qualitymerino - white sheep originating in Spain and producing a heavy fleece of exceptional quality
domestic sheep, Ovis aries - any of various breeds raised for wool or edible meat or skin
Translations

merino

[məˈriːnəʊ]
A. ADJmerino
B. N (= sheep, wool) → merino m

merino

n
(= sheep)Merino m, → Merinoschaf nt
(= wool)Merinowolle f

merino

[məˈriːnəʊ] nmerino
References in classic literature ?
Instead of her usual calico wrapper and knitted shawl she wore her best dress of brown merino, and above her thin strands of hair, which still preserved the tight undulations of the crimping-pins, rose a hard perpendicular bonnet, as to which Ethan's clearest notion was that he had to pay five dollars for it at the Bettsbridge Emporium.
March wrote that he should soon be with them, then Beth felt uncommonly well that morning, and, being dressed in her mother's gift, a soft crimson merino wrapper, was borne in high triumph to the window to behold the offering of Jo and Laurie.
Presently I discovered that she knew I was watching her, for she stirred not, she lifted not her crafty eyelid; she had glanced down from her netting to her small foot, peeping from the soft folds of her purple merino gown; thence her eye reverted to her hand, ivory white, with a bright garnet ring on the forefinger, and a light frill of lace round the wrist; with a scarcely perceptible movement she turned her head, causing her nut-brown curls to wave gracefully.
It was one of the misguided Medora's many peculiarities to flout the unalterable rules that regulated American mourning, and when she stepped from the steamer her family were scandalised to see that the crape veil she wore for her own brother was seven inches shorter than those of her sisters-in-law, while little Ellen was in crimson merino and amber beads, like a gipsy foundling.
Her merino dress, covering but not hiding the charming outline of her bosom, matched the color of the cap-ribbons, and was brightened by a white muslin apron coquettishly trimmed about the pockets, a gift from Lady Lydiard.
If you can suppose a disembodied spirit to appear in earthly clothing--of silk or merino, as the case may be--it's no great stretch to suppose, next, that this same spirit is capable of holding a mortal pencil, and of writing mortal words in a mortal sketching-book.
This,' said the fellow, producing one, 'this is the infallible and invaluable composition for removing all sorts of stain, rust, dirt, mildew, spick, speck, spot, or spatter, from silk, satin, linen, cambrick, cloth, crape, stuff, carpet, merino, muslin, bombazeen, or woollen stuff.