meristem

(redirected from meristems)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

mer·i·stem

 (mĕr′ĭ-stĕm′)
n.
The undifferentiated plant tissue from which new cells are formed, as that at the tip of a stem or root.

[Greek meristos, divided (from merizein, to divide, from meris, division; see (s)mer- in Indo-European roots) + -em (as in xylem phloem).]

mer′i·ste·mat′ic (-stə-măt′ĭk) adj.
mer′i·ste·mat′i·cal·ly adv.

meristem

(ˈmɛrɪˌstɛm)
n
(Botany) a plant tissue responsible for growth, whose cells divide and differentiate to form the tissues and organs of the plant. Meristems occur within the stem (see cambium) and leaves and at the tips of stems and roots
[C19: from Greek meristos divided, from merizein to divide, from meris portion]
meristematic adj

mer•i•stem

(ˈmɛr əˌstɛm)

n.
embryonic tissue in plants; undifferentiated, growing, actively dividing cells.
[1870–75; < Greek merist(ós) divided, distributed + -em < Greek -ēma]
mer`i•ste•mat′ic, adj.

mer·i·stem

(mĕr′ĭ-stĕm′)
Plant tissue whose cells actively divide to produce new tissues that cause the plant to grow. The cells of the meristem are not specialized but can become specialized to form the tissues of roots, leaves, and other plant parts. The growing tips of roots and stems and the tissue layer known as cambium are part of a plant's meristem.

meristem

Plant tissue consisting of rapidly dividing cells.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.meristem - undifferentiated tissue from which new cells are formed, as at the tip of a stem or rootmeristem - undifferentiated tissue from which new cells are formed, as at the tip of a stem or root
plant tissue - the tissue of a plant
Translations
méristème
분열조직
References in periodicals archive ?
Adults of both species leave characteristic feeding scars on the leaf blade surface and lay eggs in leaf petioles, where larvae burrow through leaf tissue, feeding on and damaging both apical and axillary (lateral) meristems (Stark & Goyer 1983; Center et al.
This way, the removal of the apical meristem promotes increase of auxin in the lateral meristems, decrease in ABA and increase in the transport of nutrients and cytokinins from the roots to the lateral meristems (TAIZ; ZEIGER, 2004), promoting their development, and resulting in a higher number of vegetative aerial tillers.
As plants sense and respond to signals from light and/or temperature, it is at the meristems where plant organs -- leaves or flowers -- are formed.
Whereas genetic clones created through shoot organogenesis require further manipulation for root initiation, in somatic embryogenesis, complete plants with a bipolar axis, vascular system and functional meristems are produced in a single step (Bassuner et al.
Typically, only the head (the white curd) of aborted floral meristems is eaten, while the stalk and surrounding thick, green leaves are used in vegetable broth or discarded.
Lateral meristems were cultured on basic media MS containing various PGRs 0.
In this particular instance the presence of the endophyte in the host's apical meristems has not been demonstrated (Kuijt, 1960).
Root initiation involves the dedifferentiation of specific cells, leading to the formation of root meristems (Hartmann et al.
The sorghum shoot meristems were immersed in this bacterial suspension for 30 min, blotted on a sterile filter paper and placed on co-cultivation medium in sterile Petri plates and incubated at 25[degrees]C in 16h light/8h dark cycle for four days.
In pre-anthesis, the middle portion and the inner epidermis of the ovary differentiate in two meristems (Figura 1B) (middle meristem and adaxial or ventral meristem).
Takagi (2000) compared the behavior of several tropical species and graded banana among the most sensitive plant species since all its meristems were already killed by a 10 min PVS2 treatment at room temperature, whereas 70% of the taro meristems survived a 60 min treatment.