mesa

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Me·sa

 (mā′sə)
A city of south-central Arizona, a suburb of Phoenix.

me·sa

 (mā′sə)
n.
A broad, flat-topped elevation with one or more clifflike sides, common in the southwest United States.

[Spanish, table, mesa, from Old Spanish, table, from Latin mēnsa.]

mesa

(ˈmeɪsə)
n
(Physical Geography) a flat tableland with steep edges, common in the southwestern US
[from Spanish: table]

me•sa

(ˈmeɪ sə)

n., pl. -sas.
a land formation, less extensive than a plateau, having steep walls and a relatively flat top: common in arid and semiarid parts of the southwestern U.S. and Mexico.
[1750–60, Amer.; < Sp: table < Latin mēnsa]

Me•sa

(ˈmeɪ sə)

n.
a city in central Arizona, near Phoenix. 344,764.

me·sa

(mā′sə)
An area of high land with a flat top and two or more steep, cliff-like sides. Mesas are larger than buttes and smaller than plateaus, and are common in the southwest United States.

mesa

A relatively small plateau capped by resistant horizontal rocks.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mesa - flat tableland with steep edgesmesa - flat tableland with steep edges; "the tribe was relatively safe on the mesa but they had to descend into the valley for water"
plateau, tableland - a relatively flat highland
2.Mesa - a city in Arizona just to the east of Phoenix; originally a suburb of Phoenix
Arizona, Grand Canyon State, AZ - a state in southwestern United States; site of the Grand Canyon
Translations
Tafelberg

mesa

[ˈmeɪsə] N (US) → colina f, baja duna f

mesa

nTafelberg m

mesa

[ˈmeɪsə] n (tableland) → mesa
References in classic literature ?
They had no wars and had always lived in peace and harmony, menaced only by the larger carniv-ora of the island, until my kind had come under a crea-ture called Hooja, and attacked and killed them when they chanced to descend from their natural fortresses to visit their fellows upon other lofty mesas.
In the middle was a narrow table of teak on trestle legs, with two supporting bars of iron, of the kind called in Spain mesa de hieraje.
It gave us a rather rough climb to the summit, but finally we stood upon the level mesa which stretched back for several miles to the mountain range.
Captain," he said, "for the last half-hour three men have been standing out there on the mesa.