mesothelium


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mes·o·the·li·um

 (mĕz′ə-thē′lē-əm, mĕs′-)
n. pl. mes·o·the·li·a (-lē-ə)
The layer of flat cells of mesodermal origin that lines the embryonic body cavity and gives rise to the squamous cells of the peritoneum, pericardium, and pleura.


mes′o·the′li·al adj.

mesothelium

(ˌmɛsəʊˈθiːlɪəm)
n, pl -liums or -lia (-lɪə)
(Anatomy) epithelium derived from embryonic mesoderm lining body cavities
[from New Latin, from meso- + (epi)thelium]
ˌmesoˈthelial adj

mes•o•the•li•um

(ˌmɛz əˈθi li əm, ˌmɛs-, ˌmi zə-, -sə-)

n., pl. -li•a (-li ə)
epithelium of mesodermal origin, which lines the body cavities.
[1885–90; meso- + (epi) thelium]
mes`o•the′li•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mesothelium - epithelium originating in the embryonic mesodermmesothelium - epithelium originating in the embryonic mesoderm; lines the primordial body cavity
epithelial tissue, epithelium - membranous tissue covering internal organs and other internal surfaces of the body
Translations

mes·o·the·li·um

n. mesotelio, capa celular del mesodermo embrionario que forma el epitelio que cubre las membranas serosas en el adulto.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mesothelioma is a cancerous tumour of the mesothelium, the lining of some of the major organs.
About Mesothelioma Mesothelioma is an aggressive form of cancer that occurs in the mesothelium, the thin layer of tissue that covers the lungs and other organs.
The surface mesothelium of normal serosa is derived from multipotent subserosal cells in the underlying layer of connective tissue.
The serosa is a serious membrane consisting of a layer of simple squamous epithelium, called the mesothelium, and a small amount of underlying connective tissue.
There was an extensively hyalinised nodule and no tumour in the mesothelium.
The mesothelium is a thin layer of specialized cells lining the interior aspect of the thoracic cavity (parietal pleura), the lung parenchyma (visceral pleura), the peritoneal cavity, and the pericardial cavity.
Endometriotic cells are capable of attaching to the peritoneal mesothelium, break the peritoneal lining, and destroy the extracellular matrix (ECM); thereby, they invade the surrounding tissue (5).
Alternatively, blood-borne or lymph-borne fibers could penetrate to the ovary through the mesothelium.
These lesions may represent replacement of mesothelium by an endometrial epithelium or endometrial polyp formation (9-11).
The cysts termed coelomic pericardial cysts have thin walls and are layered with unilocular and endothelium or mesothelium and contain clear liquid.
Recent literature has examined the reliability of Glut-1 in discriminating between reactive and malignant mesothelium in histological sections.