mesquite


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mes·quite

 (mĕ-skēt′, mə-)
n.
Any of various small spiny trees or shrubs of the genus Prosopis of the pea family, native to hot, dry regions chiefly of the Americas and important as a source of firewood, nectar for honeybees, and forage for cattle. The pods of most species are edible. Also called algaroba.

[Spanish mezquite, from Nahuatl mizquitl.]

mesquite

(mɛˈskiːt; ˈmɛskiːt) or

mesquit

n
(Plants) any small leguminous tree of the genus Prosopis, esp the tropical American P. juliflora, whose sugary pods (mesquite beans) are used as animal fodder. Also called: algarroba, honey locust or honey mesquite
[C19: from Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl mizquitl]

mes•quite

or mes•quit

(mɛˈskit, mɪ-)

n.
1. any of several usu. spiny trees or shrubs belonging to the genus Prosopis, of the legume family, as P. juliflora or P. glandulosa, of W North America, having bipinnate leaves and beanlike pods and often forming dense thickets.
2. the wood of such a tree or shrub, used esp. in grilling or barbecuing food.
[1830–40, Amer.; < Mexican Spanish mezquite < Nahuatl mizquitl]

Mes•quite

(mɛˈskit, mɪ-)

n.
a city in NE Texas, E of Dallas. 111,947.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mesquite - any of several small spiny trees or shrubs of the genus Prosopis having small flowers in axillary cylindrical spikes followed by large pods rich in sugarmesquite - any of several small spiny trees or shrubs of the genus Prosopis having small flowers in axillary cylindrical spikes followed by large pods rich in sugar
genus Prosopis, Prosopis - genus of tropical or subtropical branching shrubs or trees: mesquite
honey mesquite, Prosopis glandulosa, Western honey mesquite - thorny deep-rooted drought-resistant shrub native to southwestern United States and Mexico bearing pods rich in sugar and important as livestock feed; tends to form extensive thickets
Prosopis juliflora, Prosopis juliiflora, algarroba - mesquite of Gulf Coast and Caribbean Islands from Mexico to Venezuela
Prosopis pubescens, screwbean, screwbean mesquite, tornillo, screw bean - shrub or small tree of southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico having spirally twisted pods
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
References in classic literature ?
A Newspaper Reporter who had just arrived escaped by climbing a hill near by, and there he found the Sole Survivor of the expedition - a mule-driver - down on his knees behind a mesquite bush, praying with extreme fervour.
For two days and nights, crouching behind a rock topped with a growth of mesquite, and with the cliff at my back, suffering agonies of thirst and absolutely hopeless of deliverance, I fought the fellows at long range, firing occasionally at the smoke of their rifles, as they did at that of mine.
Mesquite Lake Water and Power, LLC is a participating company in Mesquite Lake Energy Park, LLC.
A senior at Mesquite told KDFW that school officials "told the entire class that they have a slight mistake that needs to be fixed," adding that the error angered many parents and students.
Perches were categorized as: (1) mesquite with live branches bearing leaves or buds and lacking exposed dead branches (live mesquite), (2) mesquite with some live branches and one or more dead branches extending 0.
Box plant in Mesquite, Texas Parent company Corporacion Durango operates seven paper mills in Mexico.
According to the SDLAC's own projections, the creation of the Mesquite Landfill should provide adequate disposal capacity beyond 2018, assuming the county continues a 50 percent diversion rate for solid waste.
Their plan went further awry when a Mesquite police officer patrolling in the area was notified of the attempted robbery by dispatchers.
Mesquite gum has been used as a binder in tablet dosage form, as an emulsifying agent and to encapsulate citrus essential oils.
As anyone who has traveled across Texas knows, mesquite covers much of the state like a thorny blanket due to a long history of overgrazing and fire suppression.
Pools of water and mesquite trees provide cooling shade and the fragrant vegetation attracts hummingbirds and butterflies.
Their main diet is pods from the plentiful mesquite trees.