messianism


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Related to messianism: Mashiach, messiahs

mes·si·a·nism

 (mĕs′ē-ə-nĭz′əm, mĭ-sī′-)
n.
1. Belief in a messiah.
2. Belief that a particular cause or movement is destined to triumph or save the world.
3. Zealous devotion to a leader, cause, or movement.

mes′si·a·nist n.

Messianism

1. a belief in a Messiah coming to deliver the Jews, restore Israel, and rule righteously, first mentioned by the Prophet Isaiah.
2. the Christian belief that Jesus Christ was the Messiah prophesied.
3. the vocation of a Messiah. — Messianic, adj.
See also: Judaism
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References in periodicals archive ?
From the retroperspective of two centuries later, neo-Platonic, neo-Romantic, neo-Hegelian eschatological impulses, intensified by a curiously mixed utopianist-pessimist messianism, appear as Weimar culture's most transhistorically relevant, transferable aspect--and therefore its most seductive feature.
But in interviews conducted by Levy shortly before his death that appeared in book form under the title Hope Now, Sartre told of his interest in Jewish messianism, wherein humanity would form a union that "is at bottom social as well as religious.
He seems to have all the narcissism but none of the messy messianism of Newcombe.
In his own essay, Roger Shinn emphasizes the Christian realists' call for modesty and an avoidance of messianism or ideological crusading in a nation's foreign policy.
In play was personal insecurity--and its converse, a self-promoting vanity--a romancing of violence, false messianism, collective instinct, the lust to destroy, and not least the claim of special privilege.
With the outbreak of insurrection in 1810, some rebels reflected elements of messianism, millenarianism, and even misplaced support for King Fernando VII.
Although he had no time for bombastic Zionist messianism, and was openly contemptuous of orthodox religion, he felt, in his wars and his peace, that he was living the Bible.
Projectiology acts exclusively within the scope of essential wisdom, or that of conscientiology [study of multidimensional consciousness], because it concentrates all of its research, without any messianism [belief in a savior or deliverer], in the third basic state of the consciousness, or the projected state, which is important to the intraphysical consciousness [consciousness in embodied human form, incarnate] and even to the extraphysical consciousness [consciousness outside or beyond human embodiment, discarnate.
Breton, who denounce the ideological utopias--and even the messianism of some--which they find in discourse about the internet.
Jewish messianism, the quasi-Buddhist cult Aum Shinrikyo, and Christian apocalyptic literature and movements all point to more terrorism.
While Voinovich finds in Solzhenitsyn many shortcomings--his denigration of the West, messianism, cultural elitism, and personal traits that include vanity, self-righteousness, and occasionally poor judgment--he is not blind to his admirable works and deeds.
I feared that my tribe had acquired an unsavory reputation for victimhood, self-righteousness, and save-the-world messianism.