messiness


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mess·y

 (mĕs′ē)
adj. mess·i·er, mess·i·est
1.
a. Disorderly and dirty: a messy bedroom.
b. Given to making messes; not neat or organized: a messy roommate.
2. Exhibiting or demonstrating carelessness: messy reasoning.
3. Unpleasantly difficult to settle or resolve: a messy court case.

mess′i·ly adv.
mess′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.messiness - a state of confusion and disorderlinessmessiness - a state of confusion and disorderliness; "the house was a mess"; "she smoothed the mussiness of the bed"
disorderliness, disorder - a condition in which things are not in their expected places; "the files are in complete disorder"
2.messiness - the trait of being untidy and messymessiness - the trait of being untidy and messy
uncleanliness - lack of cleanly habits
disarray, disorderliness - untidiness (especially of clothing and appearance)

messiness

noun
The state of being messy or unkempt:
Translations
فَوْضى
nepořádek
rodsnusk
piszkos
sóîaskapur; óreiîa

mess

(mes) noun
a state of disorder or confusion; an untidy, dirty or unpleasant sight or muddle. This room is in a terrible mess!; She looked a mess; The spilt food made a mess on the carpet.
verb
(with with) to meddle, or to have something to do with. She's always messing with the television set.
ˈmessy adjective
dirty. a messy job.
ˈmessily adverb
ˈmessiness noun
ˈmess-up noun
a muddle or state of confusion. There has been a mess-up in the timetable.
make a mess of
1. to make dirty, untidy or confused. The heavy rain has made a real mess of the garden.
2. to do badly. He made a mess of his essay.
3. to spoil or ruin (eg one's life). He made a mess of his life by drinking too much.
mess about/around
1. to behave in a foolish or annoying way. The children were shouting and messing about.
2. to work with no particular plan in a situation that involves mess. I love messing about in the kitchen.
3. (with with) to meddle or interfere with. Who's been messing about with my papers?
4. to upset or put into a state of disorder or confusion. The wind messed her hair about.
mess up
to spoil; to make a mess of. Don't mess the room up!
References in periodicals archive ?
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She details the changing landscape concerning the end of life, attitudes towards death and dying, her experience in these settings, how language is used to control the messiness of death, the history of emergency and hospice care, the literature and theories on making sense of the end of life, and providers' experiences working in end-of-life settings and what they say and do to control difficult situations.