metabotropic receptor


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Related to metabotropic receptor: Metabotropic glutamate receptor

metabotropic receptor

(mɪˌtæbəˈtrɒpɪk)
n
(Physiology) physiol an indirect receptor which initiates an intracellular biochemical cascade after it is triggered by an agonistic ligand. Compare ionotropic receptor
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The role played by glutamate in the mechanism and progression of PD via various ionotropic and metabotropic receptor types in the basal ganglia motor loop has been extensively investigated.
Glutamate can also bind to a metabotropic receptor.
1] is a G-protein-coupled metabotropic receptor that increases activity of the enzymes adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C.
GPCRs are sometimes called metabotropic receptors because their action is mediated by metabolic functions (eg, enzyme activation).
Twenty chapters are divided into four parts: neurons: excitable and secretory cells that establish synapses; ionotropic and metabotropic receptors in synaptic transmission; somato-dendritic processing and plasticity of postsynaptic potentials; the hippocampal network.
Two classes of glutamate receptors exist: ionotropic receptors (iGluRs), and metabotropic receptors (mGluRs).
Ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, protein kinase A, protein kinase C, and Src contribute to C-fiber-induced ERK activation and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation in dorsal horn neurons, leading to central sensitization.
The hypothesis that metabotropic receptors make a greater contribution to the process of learning is compatible with the idea of the more essential role of this type of receptor, compared to ionotropic ones, in the dynamics of nerve component plasticity (Eccles & McGreer, 1979).
Metabotropic receptors generally produce slower and longer-lasting reactions at the synapse that have modulatory effects rather than generate new nerve signals.
So-called metabotropic receptors , responding to the same neurotransmitters, set off chemical cascades in the receiving nerve cells, so-called "second messenger" systems, chains of chemical processes activating synthesis of neurotransmitters, of receptors and of modulators, changing the reactivity of the nerve cell and of the system it subserves.