metalanguage

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met·a·lan·guage

 (mĕt′ə-lăng′gwĭj)
n.
1. A language or vocabulary used to describe or analyze language.
2. Computers A language used to define another language.

metalanguage

(ˈmɛtəˌlæŋɡwɪdʒ)
n
(Linguistics) a language or system of symbols used to discuss another language or system. See also formal language, natural language Compare object language

met•a•lan•guage

(ˈmɛt əˌlæŋ gwɪdʒ)

n.
a language or symbolic system used to discuss, describe, or analyze another language or symbolic system.
[1935–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.metalanguage - a language that can be used to describe languagesmetalanguage - a language that can be used to describe languages
language, linguistic communication - a systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols; "he taught foreign languages"; "the language introduced is standard throughout the text"; "the speed with which a program can be executed depends on the language in which it is written"
syntax language - a language used to describe the syntax of another language
Translations
metajazyk
metakieli
hjálparmállýsimál
メタ言語
metajazyk

metalanguage

[ˈmetəˌlæŋgwɪdʒ] Nmetalenguaje m

metalanguage

nMetasprache f
References in periodicals archive ?
Navigational metalanguages for new territory in English: The potential of grammatics.
To understand the semiotics in proverbs employed in "DKH", one must understand the "MCBS" in context of the use of those metalanguages.
In Godel, Escher, Bach Douglas Hofstadter explores how metalanguages can be embedded and nested and explains how the process of "modeling" uses either linear (active) narratological relationships (embedded language) or recursive (static) loops which reduplicate messages (nested language, that is, hypertext).
The semantics of formal tense/modal languages are given in untensed and non-modal metalanguages.
This requires the introduction of explicit metalanguages, which describe and interpret the techno-linguistic elements and their different modes of meaning making Critical framing interpreting the socio-cultural context of particular meanings in a second language by having students stand back from their techno-linguistic studies and viewing these critically in relation to the local/global context Transformed practice transfer in meaning-making practice, which puts the transformed meaning to work in other contexts or cultural sites
As mediators between languages, translators are important creators of new metalanguages.
In order to understand better the concepts related to metalanguages and metamodels, OMG proposes a four-layer metamodeling architecture [3][4], oriented to standardize all the concepts of modeling, from the most abstract models to the metamodels.
It is also consistent with other definitions of metalanguages, which describe them as languages that provide for conformance-proving mechanisms.
We have seen many metalanguages in American culture in the last half of the 20th century generated by feminism, civil rights movements, peace movements, environmentalism, the abortion debate, structuralism, post-structuralism, deconstruction.
Thus, in "Literature and Metalanguage," included in his Critical Essays of 1964, Barthes drew on modern logic's distinction between metalanguages and object-languages to contextualize (post)modernist reflexivity and--by extension--the new science of narrative that it had made possible.
Not long into our conversation, I realized that I need to attend an institute or return to library school to learn the fundamentals of metadata and metalanguages.
All of the current best practices for implementing speech applications are covered, including the use of metalanguages, how "shrink wrapped" repackaged applications can be modified to fit specific application needs, how to reuse open source software and leverage the features of .